Drone footage sparks outrage at Tramlines location after Hillsborough Park left as muddy ‘building site’

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Hillsborough Park has been home to Tramlines for the past five years, but this year's heavy rain has sparked debate over whether it is the right location.

Last week (July 21 to 23) saw big names from Richard Ashcroft, the Courteeners, and Paul Heaton perform in front of tens of thousands of people as Tramlines Festival was in full swing.

But two days of near non-stop rain as festival-goers danced away on Hillsborough Park saw the ground churched up into a ‘complete mudbath’, leaving some of the Star readers questioning whether the urban green space is the right setting for Tramlines at all.

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Drone footage shared with The Star by David Hector at 7 Hills Events yesterday showed the true extent of the heavy rainfall over the weekend, and the scale of the clean-up job the Tramlines organisers now face, which will begin on July 31.

Drone footage captured by David Hector shows the scale of the clean up job facing Tramlines Festivals’ organisers after two days of constant rain and tens of thousands of partygoers churned Hillsborough Park into a “mudbath”. Drone footage captured by David Hector shows the scale of the clean up job facing Tramlines Festivals’ organisers after two days of constant rain and tens of thousands of partygoers churned Hillsborough Park into a “mudbath”.
Drone footage captured by David Hector shows the scale of the clean up job facing Tramlines Festivals’ organisers after two days of constant rain and tens of thousands of partygoers churned Hillsborough Park into a “mudbath”. | David Hector

While many have stuck up for Tramlines, and stated the grass will grow back, others have explained how the now ‘building site’-esque park has impacted those living in the area.

One of our readers, Lorraine Walton, said: “I really feel for the people who live in Hillsborough and use this park on a regular basis. School holidays and the children can’t run around and play.

“No one can help the weather, but it isn’t like all that rain wasn’t predicted. I’m sure the council could have liaised with groundsmen and a better outcome could have been achieved. Instead the damage will take months and a lot of money to put right.”

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One reader, Mark J. Allen, said the grass will take “several months” to grow back, and in the meantime has left regular park users without their green space. He said: “What do the regular users of the park do - the kids, the picnickers, the runners, various community groups such as the cycling club for those with additional needs, the amateur sports teams. The list goes on and all have lost a valuable green asset.”

Another of our readers, Aoife NicLeòid, commented: “I don't understand why they don't hold the festival in a FIELD like any other festival, not a park that local people rely on year round for all the reasons listed in these comments.”

Lesley Smith said it was “absolutely ridiculous” to hold a festival in a public park. She said: “What about all the children who need to play over the summer holidays? Not all families can afford activities throughout the holidays. I always took my boys into the park when they were little to burn off some energy. It's a beautiful park so why let Tramlines spoil it for everyone?”

Tramlines turned to muddy mayhem after two days of almost non-stop rain.Tramlines turned to muddy mayhem after two days of almost non-stop rain.
Tramlines turned to muddy mayhem after two days of almost non-stop rain. | Submitted

Luke Oggy Ogden said he is “all for Tramlines”, but says it has still left children without a place to play. He said: “People across different posts saying ‘kids can play in other parks’ fair enough, so does that mean Tramlines can be held in other parks too.”

Reader Lynn N Steve suggested Tramlines be held at the end of August before the new school year so the park can be enjoyed by everyone through the summer.

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