Met Office warns South Yorkshire drivers to prepare for snow and ice overnight after Snake Pass crash

Car overturned on Snake Pass.  Photo: Chris Owen

Car overturned on Snake Pass. Photo: Chris Owen

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Drivers in South Yorkshire have been urged to take extra care on roads overnight after today's snow led to vehicles overturning, Jacob Lotinga writes.

Simon Partridge, a forecaster speaking to The Star from the Met Office's headquarters in Exeter, said: "We do have a warning out for some icy conditions tonight."

He said that the severe weather warning was yellow, which means that the aim is to raise public awareness of conditions that could be dangerous.

Mr Patridge said that there was potential for two to three centimetres of snow over the highest South Yorkshire roads - particularly at an elevation of 200 metres or above.

The forecaster added: "We've been contacting local councils to warn them."

The aptly named Snake Pass, a notorious stretch of the A57 between Sheffield and Manchester that was closed earlier today due to poor driving conditions after a a truck and car overturned, was reopened around 3 pm, the AA said.

But AA spokesman Jack Cousens said: "We would still urge caution and drivers should still be careful driving along the Snake Pass."

This morning, Twitter user Jake Wright warned fellow motorists: "Advice if travelling the snake pass...don't bother!"

The Met Office has forecast that wintry showers will continue overnight and into Saturday over western hills, towards Manchester, and warned that this could lead to ice forming as temperatures drop.

Mr Patridge said snow that might affect South Yorkshire drivers was especially likely in the Peak District and the highest points in the Pennines.

Highways England, the company that maintains motorways and major A roads, said it had already deployed a team of gritters to make roads safe.

A Highways England spokeswoman told The Star: "In severe winter weather, we ask road users to understand that falling snow will cause some disruption."

She added that Highways England, and other road operators, would need time and space to clear the road and treat surfaces.

The Highways England spokeswoman advised motorists: "Drive with additional care in as high a gear as possible, brake gently and leave plenty of space between you and the car in front."

Highways England added, in advice issued separately, that drivers who venture on to South Yorkshire roads during severe winter weather should listen to travel bulletins and pack a "severe weather travel kit" that might include de-icer, ice scrapers, a torch, snow shovel, warm clothing, and other emergency supplies such as food and water.

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