Sheffield weather: This is when the heatwave will end and rain will return to the city according to the Met Office

Temperatures were through the roof over the weekend as a heatwave swept across Sheffield and we were treated to some absolutely glorious weather.

Monday, 19th July 2021, 10:24 am

And the good news is that the trend is set to continue into this week, with temperatures of up to 29C expected and plenty more long spells of sunshine.

The heatwave has coincided with England’s ‘Freedom Day’, which has seen all Covid restrictions lifted and nightclubs able to reopen their doors, much to the delight of many revellers who hit the city’s clubs at midnight.

There will be parties, BBQs and pub meet-ups a plenty this week as the sun continues to shine.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

A heatwave has brought extremely warm weather to Sheffield over the weekend with lots of opportunities for sunbathing, but this is when it is set to cool down and rain is set to return to the city, according to the Met Office.
A heatwave has brought extremely warm weather to Sheffield over the weekend with lots of opportunities for sunbathing, but this is when it is set to cool down and rain is set to return to the city, according to the Met Office.

However, things could be set to change on Friday, when cloud begins to decend on the city, and rain could be on the way. Maybe not what you want to hear if you are heading to Tramlines festival this weekend!

Read More

Read More
Body found in Crookes Valley Park search

Here is the current forecast for the week according to the Met Office – and when the rain is predicted to start falling and temperatures are expected to drop:

Monday, July 19: Sunny intervals. Highs of 28C in the afternoon and 23C in the evening. Low chance of rain. High pollen count.

Tuesday, July 20: Sunny. Highs of 29C in the afternoon and 23C in the evening. Low chance of rain. High pollen count.

Wednesday, July 21: Cloudy changing to sunny intervals by lunchtime. Highs of 26C in the afternoon and 20C in the evening. 30% chance of rain in the evening. High pollen count.

Thursday, July 22: Sunny intervals changing to light showers in the afternoon. Highs of 26C in the afternoon and 19C in the evening. 30% chance of rain late afternoon/early evening. High pollen count.

Friday, July 23: Cloudy changing to sunny intervals in the afternoon. Slightly lower temperatures (but still warm) with highs of 23C in the afternoon and 16C in the evening. Low chance of rain. High pollen count.

Saturday, July 24: Cloudy changing to light rain by lunchtime. Temperatures more drastically dropping with highs of 21C in the afternoon and 16C in the evening. 60% chance of rain in the afternoon.

Sunday, July 25: Overcast changing to heavy showers by lunchtime. Highs of 21C in the afternoon and 18C in the evening. 60% chance of heavy rain in the afternoon.

So unfortunately if you are heading to Tramlines this weekend, you may need to pack your umbrella and your wellies!

Warnings have also been issued while the warm weather is set to continue.

It comes after a body was found in Crookes Valley Park this morning following reports that a man got into difficulty in the water yesterday evening.

Nationally there have been a number of deaths which have occurred in open water over the weekend, including two others in Yorkshire – one in Wakefield and one in North Yorkshire.

In light of the blistering heat and the tragic deaths as many people have taken to lakes and rivers to cool off, experts have been warning people to stay safe.

The Canal and Rivers Trust 'strongly advised' against going into water, as 'there are too many risks that you can't see hidden below the surface'.

The trust said deeper water poses its own serious dangers in rivers and canals, and can be much harder to get out of if you can't put your feet on the ground.

Although the water may seem inviting, it can be much colder than anticipated, particularly in reservoirs and docks where the water is deeper.

Low temperatures can cause blood to rush away from muscles to protect the organs and limbs and muscles may become tired very quickly, which can lead to drowning.