Sheffield primary school to be rewired because its 40-year-old electrics are 'safety risk'

A primary school is set to be completely rewired because its 40-year-old electrics have been deemed to be a ‘safety risk’.

Thursday, 5th December 2019, 10:02 am
Most of the systems at Shooters Grove primary school at Stannington have not been renewed since originally being installed.

Most of the systems at Shooters Grove primary school at Stannington have not been renewed since originally being installed.

In a report, council officers say: “Their condition is best described as poor to fair overall. The existing supply is close to capacity and there are additional demands including a platform lift and new hygiene room.

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“The replacement of a gas cooker with an electric cooker in the kitchen cannot proceed until the electrical supply to the kitchen is upgraded.

“The school has raised concerns regarding safety risks from their electrical services which are outdated and inadequate.

“The main electrical installation is over 40 years old and the existing supply is not distributed efficiently around the building. Any further increase in demand is likely to exceed the supply.

“There are also safety risks from overloading existing services and an over-reliance on extension cables and multi-way sockets which also cause fire and tripping hazards.”

The school will be completed rewired with new/upgraded lighting, upgraded security alarm, integration with existing fire alarms, external CCTV and specialist control systems.

Works will begin late spring bank holiday week after SATs.

Louise Chadwick, Headteacher at Shooters Grove School said: “Like most schools we regularly manage problems with our building. We take advice from the local authority about how to do this whilst also lobbying for additional resources to make improvements.

“We are delighted that we will receive an upgrade to our electrical system later this school year and will continue to work with the council to manage any issues until this happens.

“The safety of pupils and staff is naturally paramount and we always seek to ensure that learning is not disrupted or undermined.

“The lack of capital investment available to our school is extremely frustrating and we know that the amount of money that the city receives for this work is only a fraction of the amount that has been identified as necessary. “