First phase of Sheffield Attercliffe Waterside regeneration goes ahead to create hundreds of new homes

Watch more of our videos on Shots! 
and live on Freeview channel 276
Visit Shots! now
Ambitious plans for hundreds of canalside homes and commercial activities as part of the regeneration of the Attercliffe area of Sheffield have taken a major step forward.

The first part of the Attercliffe Waterside scheme includes 362 new homes, public areas, a new pedestrian bridge across the Sheffield and Tinsley Canal and the repurposing of old buildings. The plan was approved by Sheffield City Council’s planning and highways committee yesterday (July 9).

Eventually, developer Citu will build 1,000 homes set to be delivered in three phases, alongside leisure outlets and creative workspaces, all straddling the Sheffield and Tinsley Canal.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

Some of the old industrial buildings in and around the former Spartan Works on Attercliffe Road will be repurposed and others will be demolished.

The first phase of the Attercliffe Waterside development in Sheffield has just been approved - this image from developer Citu shows a view on entering the site on the south side from the bridgeThe first phase of the Attercliffe Waterside development in Sheffield has just been approved - this image from developer Citu shows a view on entering the site on the south side from the bridge
The first phase of the Attercliffe Waterside development in Sheffield has just been approved - this image from developer Citu shows a view on entering the site on the south side from the bridge

The scheme forms part of a major council regeneration plan for the formerly thriving steelmaking area in the city’s East End. That will use £17m of government Levelling Up funding.

It involves the creation of a world-leading Centre for Child Health Technology, turning the Adelphi Theatre into a cultural hub and connectivity between the Olympic Legacy Park and the Attercliffe Road high street.

Ripple

Planning officer Jacob George told councillors that phase one will see mainly homes for single people, with family homes coming later. Eventually there will be a mixture of apartments, townhouses, terraces and back-to-backs, he said.

Attercliffe Waterside masterplan, produced by developer CituAttercliffe Waterside masterplan, produced by developer Citu
Attercliffe Waterside masterplan, produced by developer Citu

The development will be marketed as car-free, with good walking, cycling and public transport routes available. Residents will be able to buy separate parking spaces and there will be a car club, said Mr George.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

Chris Thompson, a founder and director of developer Citu, referred to the climate and nature emergencies, adding: “We don’t identify ourselves as being a housebuilder. We are here to create a great place that is aligned with those challenges.”

He said the aim is to create a development that will create a “ripple effect” locally, nationally and internationally as to how such change can be made. The idea is to achieve net zero climate emissions.

An artist's impression showing a view of the Attercliffe Waterside development from the side of the Sheffield and Tinsley CanalAn artist's impression showing a view of the Attercliffe Waterside development from the side of the Sheffield and Tinsley Canal
An artist's impression showing a view of the Attercliffe Waterside development from the side of the Sheffield and Tinsley Canal

Mr Thompson said that the project is challenging with a lot of obstacles to overcome, but also very exciting.

Coun Brian Holmshaw said: “I am very pleased to see such good quality housing in the area in its proper context with good public transport in the area.”

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

Heritage

He referred to proposals to transform the frontage of 1960s pub The Sportsman with a mural and said he agreed with a conservation advisory group’s calls for the tiling to be retained. Mr Jacob said that the tiling was not considered to be of heritage significance.

Coun Holmshaw urged the developers to look again at the proposal to see if there might be some middle ground. Councillors adopted that as an addition to conditions on the plan’s approval.

Council heritage champion Coun Janet Ridler said that the feasibility of retaining any heritage structures should be considered, without compromising the overall design.

Coun Tony Downing criticised the lack of affordable or social housing, adding: “They (developers) always seem to come back and say it isn’t financially viable, while I welcome new housing there, it’s needed.”

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

Mr George responded that the council’s Local Plan, which is still in draft form, will bring in a policy where developers will have to include more affordable new homes in their plans. At present, there is no justification in planning terms for the council to reject plans because of a lack of this.

Coun Richard Williams said: “I welcome this application, it’s very exciting.”

He asked about the provision of extra infrastructure such as NHS facilities and school places.

Mr George responded that council policy is again limited in what can be required.