First Black History Month African-Caribbean Market launches in Sheffield

Sheffield’s first Black History Month African-Caribbean Market has been officially launched with a special opening ceremony in the city centre.

By Lisa Wong
Tuesday, 26th October 2021, 11:20 am

The event took place at Fargate on Monday, October 25 and featured talks from some of Sheffield’s dignitaries and community leaders, and performances including from award-winning pianist and composer Okiem Warmann.

The Black History Month African-Caribbean Market has been organised by Adira, and is supported by Sheffield City Council, Sheffield Property Association, Sheffield Business Together, Action Collective and Unity Project Sheffield.

Ursula Myrie, co-founder of Adira, said at the opening ceremony: “This is what diversity looks like,” as she praised those who had supported her with making the event become a reality.

Darnall Community Gospel choir at the opening ceremony of Sheffield's first African Caribbean market, organised by ADIRA - October 25.

Kate Josephs, chief executive of Sheffield City Council, told how being involved with such a project was important “to tackle and eliminate prejudice and discrimination, both as a major employer in the city and as a civic leader”.

Kevin Hylton, the chair of Sheffield Race Equality Commission, highlighted the aims of the commission in addressing racial disparities within the city, and the Lord Mayor, Gail Smith, also spoke at the ceremony.

For the duration of the week up until October 30, there will be a range of activities on offer to celebrate Black History Month.

Market stalls on Fargate will be selling authentic African-Caribbean food, clothes, books, crafts, and more.

The opening ceremony took place at Fargate and featured talks from some of Sheffield’s dignitaries and community leaders, and performances including from award-winning pianist and composer Okiem Warmann.

There will also be a variety of live performances from singers, dancers, spoken word, and poets.

As well as events on Fargate, activities are also taking place within the Moor Market.

A Windrush Pioneers Exhibition details the experiences of people from African-Caribbean communities through pictures and stories.

The Looking Glass Into My Black Mind art exhibition shines a spotlight on mental health from the perspectives of young Black artists aged 18-25, who demonstrate ‘what mental health looks like through our eyes’.

A Human Library gives people the opportunity to hear stories first hand, of individuals from Sheffield’s African-Caribbean community.

In addition, there is an opportunity to ‘take a step back in time’ in the Front Room exhibition, in which a 1950s-1960s Jamaican Front Room has been recreated. Plays will be shown here towards the end of the week.