Richard Wood column: The Rotherham United defender on how players and little clubs lose out under the new transfer rules

Beating Brentford gave us all a boost
Beating Brentford gave us all a boost
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It was great to get our first league win on Saturday. To record our first three points after four league games is a big positive because confidence certainly drains as more and more games pass by without winning.

We can now move on and we will look to build on that victory with another three points against Barnsley, before the International break which see Sam Allardyce take charge of England for the first time.

Danny Ward scores for Rotherham against Brentford, Rotherham, United Kingdom, 20th August 2016. Photo by Glenn Ashley.

Danny Ward scores for Rotherham against Brentford, Rotherham, United Kingdom, 20th August 2016. Photo by Glenn Ashley.

It will be interesting to see who makes his first squad. After the performance at the Euros, I expect him to include some new faces. I think he will include Mark Noble, who has found himself unlucky to have never made the England squad before. Allardyce managed him at West Ham, so knows all about his qualities. I also hope Danny Drinkwater will be given a chance.

The transfer window closes next Wednesday and, with there been no emergency loans allowed this season, I expect a busy week ahead for all teams as they look to complete their squads.

The next time all Premier League and Football League clubs will be able to sign players will be when the transfer window reopens again for the month of January.

I must say that I have to disagree with this rule and think FIFA need to rethink the ruling for future seasons. The emergency loan system, I believe, benefits all English teams throughout the leagues.

The gulf in finances between teams in the Premier League and the lower-league teams is huge and these lower-league clubs can’t afford to have big squads. Their budgets just aren’t big enough to cope. This is where the bigger clubs can help out, loaning out their younger pros or players who are not involved with the first team. Doing this enables these players to gain valuable first-team experience by playing competitive matches, which will in turn see the parent club reap the rewards in the long run.

I believe there will be a lot of unhappy players in the next few months. Clubs up and down the country have to have bigger squads due to not having the emergency loan system to account for injuries and suspensions. This means more players missing out on a matchday, and I know first hand how frustrating this can be.

I hate not been involved in football matches and this has happened to me over the last couple of years. I felt I wasn’t getting enough game-time, and became increasingly frustrated at not being involved. The emergency loan window allowed me to join first Crawley, then Fleetwood and finally Chesterfield to get me playing on a weekly basis.

There are, therefore, many advantages to the emergency loan window, so it will be interesting to see how things pan out as the season goes on.

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