Sheffield gang member handed ban

Nathan Lang, of Penrith Road, was jailed for eight years In July last year after admitting conspiracy to supply Class B drugs, possession of a firearm and possession of a firearm with intent to cause fear of violence.
Nathan Lang, of Penrith Road, was jailed for eight years In July last year after admitting conspiracy to supply Class B drugs, possession of a firearm and possession of a firearm with intent to cause fear of violence.
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A member of a notorious Sheffield drugs gang serving time in prison has been banned from associating with other members after a judge gave him a criminal behaviour order.

Nathan Lang, of Penrith Road, was jailed for eight years In July last year after admitting conspiracy to supply Class B drugs, possession of a firearm and possession of a firearm with intent to cause fear of violence.

Lang was sentenced along with 10 other members of the Parson Cross-based gang – known as ‘PXG’ – who were involved in dealing massive quantities of heroin, cocaine and cannabis and had access to a variety of guns to protect their territory from rival gangs.

The 24-year-old appeared again at Sheffield Crown Court for an application requesting permission to make him the subject of a CBO, banning him from associating with, or contacting members of the PXG.

Recorder David Preston told Lang: “Known as the Parson Cross Group gang, Joe Mitchell was able to run the gang from prison.

“This kind of offending can take place from prison, and it is for this reason that these kind of orders are made before defendants are released from custody.”

Recorder Preston said Lang’s association with the PXG could lead to further violent offending.

The court heard Lang objected to the order on the basis he was currently serving a custodial sentence and because it would not be possible for him to completely avoid the other members of the PXG as he was likely to return to the Parson Cross area on release and might pass them on the street.

But Recorder Preston said the definition of the order was clear – and that members are prevented from ‘associating with or contacting’ with those stated in the order.

He granted the two-year order, which can be extended indefinitely by the courts.

CBOs were introduced to tackle serious offenders, who engage in criminal activity and anti-social behaviour.