Life expectancy has fallen in Sheffield according to new report on city health

Life expectancy in Sheffield is falling, according to a new report
Life expectancy in Sheffield is falling, according to a new report
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Life expectancy of Sheffield residents is falling, according to a new report.

Sheffield Council has drafted it's annual health report analysing the state of the city's well being.

Health inequality in the city has been highlighted again

Health inequality in the city has been highlighted again

The report found life expectancy was on the decline in the city, mirroring statistics on a national level.

The latest figures show that life expectancy for men in Sheffield decreased from 78.8 years in 2012-14 to 78.7 years in 2013-15. For women, life expectancy remained the same at 82.5 years in both 2012-14 and 2013-15.

The average healthy life expectancy – how long people can expect to be in good health for – also decreased. For women, this was from 61.5 years in 2009-11 to 59.9 years in 2013-15.

The decrease in men’s healthy life expectancy has been less sharp over the same period, reducing from 59.3 years to 59 years.

The report was compiled by Greg Fell, director of public health at Sheffield Council

The report was compiled by Greg Fell, director of public health at Sheffield Council

Council bosses say a drop in life expectancy is down to increasing levels of poverty and inequality. Recent reports have shown some council wards differ by up to 10 years.

The report adds GP records show almost 40 per cent of the Sheffield population has at least one long term condition with 'indications suggest the percentage is not likely to decrease anytime soon'.

Health chiefs add that ‘unhealthy person years’ are 'not evenly spread' across the population with the burden falling 'disproportionately on poorer people'.

A key recommendation of the report calls on both the council and the Sheffield NHS Clinical Commissioning Group to ask Public Health England to coordinate further research how negative childhood experiences affect long-term health.

Greg Fell, director of public health on Sheffield Council said: "We’ve seen over the last year or so that the historic improvements in life expectancy have ground to a halt. That’s been happening nationally and it’s happening in Sheffield as well.

“There are some signs it’s getting worse in some parts of the country. We’ve not seen this here in Sheffield yet but we may well do. And what’s worrying, is that this is not evenly spread – people who are vulnerable and less affluent are having a worse deal.

“Scientific evidence shows that austerity is a factor in this and our response needs to look at what we’re doing as a city around tackling poverty. There’s no easy answer to this but it’s something that affects the whole of society, therefore the whole society needs to be involved in the solution.”

The public health report is being discussed by Sheffield Council’s cabinet on Wednesday, 20 September before going to a full council meeting on October 6 at 5pm.