Sheffield United: Bramall Lane's greatest ever player says Chris Wilder has put The Blades back on the map

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Whatever happens at Loftus Road, whether Sheffield United win, lose or draw, Chris Wilder will be able to glance over his shoulder towards the directors box and know he can count on someone's unequivocal support.

Tony Currie, previously of England, Queens Park Rangers and officially the visitors' greatest ever player, is still getting to grips with his new role on Bramall Lane's board. But he is absolutely sure of one thing; whatever decisions the manager takes, be it tactically or in the transfer market, is alright by him.

Tony Currie

Tony Currie

"Chris has transformed our club," he said, ahead of this afternoon's fixture in west London. "He's put us back on the map. With everything Chris has done, he's earned the right and the respect to be trusted. So I support him, in whatever he does, 100 per cent."

United travel to the capital searching for their first Championship points of the season after being beaten by Middlesbrough and Swansea City. Those results, combined with the catalogue of individual errors which condemned them to defeat in the North-East, have gnawed away at the confidence of many supporters who were predicting another play-off challenge less than two weeks ago.

Although Wilder acknowledges some of their concerns, reflected by United's efforts to sign another centre-forward on loan, he could scarcely conceal his frustration with those who have written-off their chances after less than three-and-a-half hours of football during his pre-match media conference yesterday.

Like Chelsea's Maurizio Sarri, who described himself as "bored" by the theatrical element of transfer windows, the 50-year-old admitted he prefers to work quitely and methodically in the shadows rather than play to the crowd.

"Chris is his own man," Currie, who was appointed earlier this month, continued. "He'll always do what he thinks is best for the club and for the team. He's single-minded and that's a great thing. You can see the respect all of the ex-players have got for him and I think that tells you a lot."

Currie, aged 68, made nearly 400 appearances for United after arriving from Watford half a century ago. Capped 17 times by his country, he also spent three years with Rangers before announcing his retirement in 1984, captaining them during the 1982 FA Cup final replay against Tottenham Hotspur.

Reflecting upon United's start to the previous campaign, which saw them mount a strong challenge for the play-offs, Currie said: "If we win this one then we'll have the same number of points as last year and look how well we did then. It's still very early in the season, we've got a great manager, a great group of lads and those are two of the most important ingredients in any team."

"Chris is close to a lot of the old boys, including from my era," he added. "As part of my job, I've been asked to comment on footballing matters at board meetings. But I wouldn't tell Chris to do anything. All I would tell him is that, if he needed a chat about anything, I'd always be there for him. That's the esteem I hold him in."

The announcement Currie had become a director came shortly after United named one of the stands at their ground in his honour.

"I can't begin to explain how honoured I am," Currie said. "I've always been around the place because and nothing is going to change in that regard. One of the things I am looking forward to doing though is seeing a few more of the academy games on a Saturday morning and chatting with Travis (Binnion) and the guys there."

Tony Currie, previously of England, Queens Park Rangers and officially the visitors' greatest ever player, is still getting to grips with his new role on Bramall Lane's board. But he is absolutely sure of one thing; whatever decisions the manager takes, be it tactically or in the transfer market, is alright by him.

"Chris has transformed our club," he said, ahead of this afternoon's fixture in west London. "He's put us back on the map. With everything Chris has done, he's earned the right and the respect to be trusted. So I support him, in whatever he does, 100 per cent."

United travel to the capital searching for their first Championship points of the season after being beaten by Middlesbrough and Swansea City. Those results, combined with the catalogue of individual errors which condemned them to defeat in the North-East, have gnawed away at the confidence of many supporters who were predicting another play-off challenge less than two weeks ago.

Although Wilder acknowledges some of their concerns, reflected by United's efforts to sign another centre-forward on loan, he could scarcely conceal his frustration with those who have written-off their chances after less than three-and-a-half hours of football during his pre-match media conference yesterday.

Like Chelsea's Maurizio Sarri, who described himself as "bored" by the theatrical element of transfer windows, the 50-year-old admitted he prefers to work quitely and methodically in the shadows rather than play to the crowd.

"Chris is his own man," Currie, who was appointed earlier this month, continued. "He'll always do what he thinks is best for the club and for the team. He's single-minded and that's a great thing. You can see the respect all of the ex-players have got for him and I think that tells you a lot."

Currie, aged 68, made nearly 400 appearances for United after arriving from Watford half a century ago. Capped 17 times by his country, he also spent three years with Rangers before announcing his retirement in 1984, captaining them during the 1982 FA Cup final replay against Tottenham Hotspur.

Reflecting upon United's start to the previous campaign, which saw them mount a strong challenge for the play-offs, Currie said: "If we win this one then we'll have the same number of points as last year and look how well we did then. It's still very early in the season, we've got a great manager, a great group of lads and those are two of the most important ingredients in any team."

"Chris is close to a lot of the old boys, including from my era," he added. "As part of my job, I've been asked to comment on footballing matters at board meetings. But I wouldn't tell Chris to do anything. All I would tell him is that, if he needed a chat about anything, I'd always be there for him. That's the esteem I hold him in."

The announcement Currie had become a director came shortly after United named one of the stands at their ground in his honour.

"I can't begin to explain how proud I am," Currie said. "I've always been around the place because and nothing is going to change in that regard. One of the things I am looking forward to doing though is seeing a few more of the academy games on a Saturday morning and chatting with Travis (Binnion) and the guys there."