Martin Smith column: how Sheffield United can thrive thanks in part to David Brooks

Bournemouth's David Brooks (left) and Crystal Palace's Patrick van Aanholt battle for the ball during the Premier League match
Bournemouth's David Brooks (left) and Crystal Palace's Patrick van Aanholt battle for the ball during the Premier League match

David Brooks, the gift that keeps on giving.

Sheffield United may have lost that Giggs-like turn and touch, the searing pace and confidence but Brooks (formerly) of Sheffield may yet get United promoted.

News that the Blades borrowed £7.5 million on the back of cash expected from Bournemouth as part of the £11 million transfer total for Brooks may have unsettled older Blades who remember dark pre-Kevin McCabe days.

But borrowing money on the back of the Brooks deal makes perfect sense.

It pays the wages and gives Chris Wilder chance to compete for the players he needs.

It’s difficult to balance finance and ambition in football especially when your club has had its fingers burned in the past.

But as risks go this is low-key and the club’s upward momentum depends on it and others to follow.

The Sheffield United academy has been a nice little earner for the club for 20 years now with Harry Maguire, Kyle Walker, Phil Jagielka, Dominic Calvert-Lewin, Kyle Naughton and Matt Lowton topping the list of former Blades in the Premier League.

Selling, spending and borrowing are part of football life for clubs like United and Wednesday. 

Get the balance right and the team and the club can fly, and, early though it may be United are top of the league.

So far, so good.

*American football continues to build its fan base in the UK but you had to feel sorry for photographers covering Seattle Seahawks 27-3 win over Oakland Raiders at Wembley on Sunday.

Seahawks wide receiver David Moore – all 6ft 2in and 15 stones of him - took out a couple of snappers after he caught a touchdown pass in the second quarter of the game and careered into advertising hoardings behind which the photographers were camped.

The game is growing in popularity in the UK  - 85,000 were at Wembley on Sunday.

No serious injuries were reported but looking for more on Moore, major broadcaster NBC Sports Digital website, ‘Rotoworld’ had this - which illustrates that the gridiron game still has much to do to capture the sporting imagination of the average Brit:

“Moore…made another big play on a contested catch to add perimeter explosiveness to Seattle's offense. 

“Moore should be rostered in all Dynasty leagues and deeper season-long formats as the Seahawks' lone plus-sized wideout in three-receiver sets.”

Blimey.