Chance to own a piece of Sheffield's history as converted forge goes on sale

The grounds contain the ruins of many of the old forge buildings (photo: Saxton Mee)
The grounds contain the ruins of many of the old forge buildings (photo: Saxton Mee)
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A rare chance to own a piece of Sheffield's history has arisen, for anyone with £550,000 to spare.

A home built among the ruins of a once world-renowned iron forge within the Rivelin Valley has gone on sale, for the first time since being painstakingly restored by its current owners.

The building was lovingly restored by its current owners in the 1980s (photo: Saxton Mee)

The building was lovingly restored by its current owners in the 1980s (photo: Saxton Mee)

Mousehole Forge, tucked away off Stannington Road, was famed during the 18th and 19th centuries for producing anvils - one of which remains on display at Gretna Green, in Scotland.

It closed in 1933 and was left to crumble until the 1980s, when part of the old works was reconstructed and turned into a family home with the most romantic setting.

The substantial four-bedroom property, with two large outbuildings and vast grounds, is now on the market for the first time.

The Grade II-listed 'hidden gem' is being marketed by Saxton Mee, with a guide price of £550,000 to £575,000.

The old forge was famed for producing anvils (photo: Saxton Mee)

The old forge was famed for producing anvils (photo: Saxton Mee)

Linda Crapper, managing director of the estate agents, said: "It was painstakingly re-built exactly as it had been, using the old pressed bricks and natural stone, and there are some beautiful buildings in the grounds.

"There are so many historic remains of buildings from when it was an old forge. It's almost like stepping back in history.

"It's set back so far from the road you would never know it was there. It has the feel of a secret garden, in the middle of the beautiful Rivelin Valley.

"It would suit someone who wants to run a business from home, because of the substantial outbuildings, or someone looking for a family annex.

This framed poster is a nod to the site's industrial heritage (photo: Saxton Mee)

This framed poster is a nod to the site's industrial heritage (photo: Saxton Mee)

"The interior is a little dated because it's been in the same hands for so long, but it's still a beautiful property inside and out.

"The garage still has a huge chimney breast where they would have done the forge baking and had blowers making the anvils.

"It's very rare for something like this to come on the market."

As well as the remains of the old forge, the grounds include a series of waterways connected via culverts to the river.

Inside the property (photo: Saxton Mee)

Inside the property (photo: Saxton Mee)

Mousehole Forge dates back to at least 1628, according to the Rivelin Valley Conservation Group, when there were two lead mills; a farmhouse, which forms part of the present house; and a small cutlery workshop.

The mills were later converted to an iron forge, which by the end of the 18th century had become one of the leading exporters to the US.

The site is today designated as a Scheduled Ancient Monument, and the workshop range is Grade II-listed.

The property is on the Rivelin Valley (photo: Saxton Mee)

The property is on the Rivelin Valley (photo: Saxton Mee)

The ornate gates to the property (photo: Saxton Mee)

The ornate gates to the property (photo: Saxton Mee)