Making a mockery of Sheffield Council

The Lord Mayor of Sheffield Magid Magid leads the 2018 Sheffield Carnival parade through Norfolk Park. Picture Scott Merrylees
The Lord Mayor of Sheffield Magid Magid leads the 2018 Sheffield Carnival parade through Norfolk Park. Picture Scott Merrylees
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I spent twenty-four years in service as both the Lord Mayor’s chauffeur’s attendant and as one of the council’s civic chauffeurs, at times working directly with the Lord Mayors holding office during that period.

I have since retired and seeing what has become of the position since the appointment of the Right Worshipful Lord Mayor Magid Magid is deeply insulting.

I think it is embarrassing, insolent and deeply disrespectful for the current Lord Mayor of Sheffield to conduct himself in the way that he is.

I can acknowledge that he is attempting to bring the role into the twentyfirst century and highlight how archaic and outdated the position is at the taxpayers’ expense. However, I believe the methods he is using are downright childish.

For example, his decision to play the imperial march from Star Wars and the main theme from Superman at his mayor-making ceremony reflects an unwillingness to consider all demographics within the city he represents and instead panders almost entirely to the younger age group. Now, it is important to enthuse young people about politics yet the way in which Magid is going about this not only disregards the older people he represents, but also perpetuates the regressive far-left sentiment which has inadvertently put people like Trump into office.

Magid’s own views on Trump can also be called into question. He has every right to disagree with Trump’s view and policies, although his attempt to ban the leader of the country deemed our closest ally from Sheffield, despite not having the power to do so, and to call him a “wasteman”, displays a level of buffoonery on-par with Trump himself.

The final example of the new Lord Mayor undermining the position he has been given was the revelation of his “ten commandments of Sheffield” presented at the Tramlines festival recently.

Amongst these was the instruction to “never kiss a Tory” which is an abuse of the position which is supposed to remain politically neutral.

All in all, perhaps Magid is right to draw attention to how out-of-date the position really is. However, in my opinion, the approach he is taking is making a mockery of the Sheffield council; something that I was proud to be a part of for so long.

Sam Mayo

Sheffield, S26