Be a Diabetes UK runner

Diabetes UK, Great North run
Diabetes UK, Great North run
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Have your say

Be a Great North Runner for Diabetes UK.

Diabetes UK are urging people go the extra mile on Sunday, September 9, by taking part in this year’s Simply Health Great North Run for the charity.

We are asking those who have secured a place in the Great North Run ballot to consider running for us and support our work towards a world where diabetes can do no harm.

Officially the world’s biggest half marathon, the race sees thousands of runners take on the 13.1 mile route, absorbing views of some of the North East’s most iconic landmarks including the Tyne Bridge and The Sage along the route which takes runners from Newcastle City Centre to the coast in South Shields.

Diabetes is a serious condition that, if not properly managed, can lead to devastating complications such as blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke and amputation.

Every day, around 700 people are diagnosed with diabetes so every mile you run and every pound you raise for Diabetes UK will help us realise a world where diabetes can do no harm.

All Diabetes UK runners receive a branded vest, crazy hair, a fundraising toolkit, online support and training tips.

They will also be cheered on by Diabetes UK supporters along the route giving them an extra boost towards the finish line.

If you would like to run for Diabetes UK please contact the events fundraising team on 0345 1232399 or email events.fundraising@diabetes.org.uk

Stephen Ryan

Head of the North, Diabetes UK

Soft touch Britain

The NHS say they need to cut back on surgical operations to save £200 million.

I suggest they should start by looking into the foreigners they treat, costing the NHS untold costs for treatment and then leave the country without paying the bill.

The British taxpayer, or should I say us mugs, are left to pick up the tab.

It’s what you might call soft touch Britian.

EB Warris

by email

It defies common sense

I saw the pictures on the internet of the lads wearing skirts after the school said no to shorts for the boys in this hot weather.

The lads were sent home as they were not in the required uniform.

Maybe on hot days the lads want to be girls and get some air around the legs. Who wants to be trussed up on these very warm days?

I find it so silly that boys cannot wear shorts when the weather is like it is right now.

I am all for uniform conformity, as it’s important to set the right example, but these decisions defy common sense.

Jayne Grayson

Sheffield, S35

Inspired contributions

How refreshing and heartening to receive a letter of support from John C Fowler, a fellow contributor to the Your Say pages Star, June 30, 2018.

Thank you John for your kind words regarding “still good people” .

I write my letters with the hopeful intention of promoting food for thought and written discussion among the many Star readers.

In my case, while the body may no longer pass its MOT I try to keep the old brainbox active by rewarding/punishing readers with my thoughts for debate and response via the letters feature.

I hope that the promised cooler weather will recharge your sapped energy and restore your full vocabulary, I look forward to further “inspired” contributions from you.

Cyril Olsen

Busk Meadow, Sheffield, S5

Filth and education?

Should there be courses in health and the environment for students?

On arriving at my place of work this morning I was horrified to see the discarded clothing, rubbish and even food left on the main highway of the city centre, where not only is it in walking distance of professional businesses, many eateries and a view for guests from a nearby well- established hotel but causes a huge health risk from rats.

Perhaps a lesson in manners and respect or a fine for the parents whose offspring have no thought for the city that has been educating them?

Ms Barber

Sheffield, S1

Adventure activities

We should be proud that countless deaths and injuries have been avoided because of the UK’s robust approach to safety.

Yet safety measures in place for adventure activities are under review, and one option up for discussion is to abolish the licensing authority and replace it with a voluntary scheme.

How parents would be happy to send their child off on a kayaking or mountainbiking excursion without a statutory, enforced, safety scheme in place is difficult to fathom.

Health and safety protection should be celebrated, not watered down.

It must be noted that many safety laws have their roots in Europe.

This means that proper scrutiny is needed during the Brexit process when it is decided which laws will stay and which will go when the UK leaves the EU.

Brett Dixon

Nottingham

Diamonds of our society

In a world of greed, vanity, backstabbing and self preservation, how nice to see a letter about Barnardo”s volunteers.

These people are the real diamonds of our society.

Also anyone else who gives their time for good causes who often go unheard of.

Although they don’t do it for recognition it would be nice to see more of these people recognised when the “Honours list” comes round .

It’s never going to happen though, is it?

Dave Hudson

Sheffield, S1