Videogamers give their opinion on Sheffield's newest museum

A new museum celebrating the past, present and future of videogaming opened this weekend '“ and visitors impressed by what they saw.

Sunday, 25th November 2018, 2:49 pm
Updated Sunday, 25th November 2018, 2:55 pm
Four-year-old Joe Fletcher retro gaming with mum Mandy. Pictures: Dean Atkins

The National Videogame Museum welcome its first visitors to the former Castle House building in Sheffield city centre on Saturday morning, after moving from the Nottingham base where it has spent the last three and a half years.

It is hoped the museum will attract more than 50,000 gamers to the city every year, allowing people of all ages to play, learn and create all at the same time.

National Video Arcade opens in the former Castle House Co-op building in Sheffield

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Let the games begin '“ Sheffield's newest museum to open its doors to 50,000 in...

The museum currently has about 80 playable games, but it is hoped the number will grow.

Visitors took to social media after visiting to give their first impressions of the museum.

Ted wrote: '@nvmuk Reopening day was good!

Retro gamers relive the '80s

'Enjoyed the arcade games and talking with the manager about the new venue, there's room for improvement but it is only the first day!

'Looking forward to what the future brings for it.'

Allan Noy' had a great experience.

Jamie Depledge and Rachael Bowden enjoy the old games on display

'Awesome time @nvmuk playing the classic games,' he wrote.

'Definitely brought back some old memories.'

And Angela agreed, adding: 'Reliving my gaming past at the National Videogame Museum. Trying to play The Hobbit and still stuck in a room. Brilliant place, I will be back.'

Aidan Stones' tweeted: 'Back to the future. @nvmuk opens up in Castle House. Retro gaming bringing life to Castlegate.

Four-year-old Joe Fletcher retro gaming with mum Mandy

'Momentum building for the area.'

As well as featuring the full array of what games currently are, the museum also wants to allow people to imagine what the future might hold.

They will show unfinished games in the hope of explaining how developers create them, thereby inspiring the next generation to make adventures of their own.