Investigators find no lessons to be learned after Sheffield tram-train crash

Rail acident specialists looking into a Sheffield tram-train crash, which happened on its first day of service, have decided not to carry out further investigations into the incident.

The Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB) said that carrying out further work into the crash would be unlikely to result in safety recommendations.

The scene of the crash. Picture and video: Sam Cooper / The Star.

The scene of the crash. Picture and video: Sam Cooper / The Star.

Four people were injured when the tram-tram crashed into a lorry carrying gas canisters at the junction of Woodbourn Road and Staniforth Road at around 3.30pm on October 25 – just hours after the service welcomed passengers for the first time.

READ MORE: No arrests after Sheffield to Rotherham tram-train crashes on first day of service

The tram-train was travelling from Parkgate into Sheffield city centre when the collision happened.

In a statement, the RAIB said: “We sent an inspector to Sheffield following a collision between a tram-train and a lorry.

“Based on the evidence that was gathered, we have decided not to investigate further as it is unlikely that this would result in safety recommendations.”

READ MORE: Grieving family REFUSE to blame anyone after fatal Sheffield crash which killed four people

Stagecoach Supertram, who operate the service, have requested specialist engineers from manufacturer Stadler, based in Spain, assess the damage to the vehicle.

Passengers said the tram-train lifted around 1m in the air before derailing and landed around 6m to the left of the tracks.

Steve Barber, vice president of the Light Rail Transit Association, who was on board at the time of the crash, said the vehicle was travelling at around 20mph when the collision took place.

The pilot project was orginally due to be operational in 2015 at a cost of £15 million.

READ MORE: Sheffield fatal crash: Teenage boy remains in police custody

It launched almost three years late at a total cost of £75 million.

Mr Barber said: “I was sat in the front seat of the tram and we were approaching the junction and all I saw was a lorry in front and then the bed of it hit the tram.

“The next minute we were up in the air and my back went. The windows were all smashed and we landed about 6m to the left of the tracks."

The Star has contacted South Yorkshire Police for details of any arrests and is awaiting a response.