This is what motorists think about a new Sheffield bus gate camera that has led to fines worth over £100, 000

A new camera that has led to scores of motorists being fined for driving down a city centre bus gate has sparked debate among Star readers.

Monday, 15th April 2019, 9:34 am
Updated Tuesday, 23rd April 2019, 7:20 pm

The Glossop Road bus and tram gate camera used to snap around 1,350 motorists each year – but now spots around 4,500 contraventions.

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It means the income from penalty charge notice fines has shot up from around £45,000 per year to about £108,500.

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The bus gate.

Council bosses say the camera changed last October from a ‘manual observation camera’ via CCTV to an automatic number plate recognition camera.

A number of drivers have taken to Facebook to make their views known on the move.

Carly McCalla believes “this should really be a through road. Because of this bus gate, the Ring Road between Waitrose roundabout and the end of Glossop Road is always heavily congested.”

Lucy Charlesworth added: “This is one of the reasons why I refuse to drive in town.”

Kathleen Hassanali said it is “just causing more pollution and back logs of traffic.”

But others said drivers should be more aware of the rules and take note of the signs.

Chris Bragg said: “If you choose and can afford to run a car, be observant and you won't need to worry about fines. The signs are there, the signs are large.”

The rules state that the westbound stretch of Glossop Road, between Regent Street and Gell Street, is off-limits to drivers on weekdays from 4pm to 6.30pm to prevent delays to buses and trams but remains open to all traffic at other times.

Between 2016/17 there were 1,353 contraventions which amounted to £44,967 in penalty notices.

The fine for driving in a bus lane in Sheffield is £60, with a £30 discount for early payment. Any camera enforcement income is invested back into public transport, cycling and walking schemes.