Three people arrested as protests mark resumption of tree-felling Sheffield

An arborist at work during tree-felling in Sheffield
An arborist at work during tree-felling in Sheffield
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Three people were today arrested in Sheffield after the controversial tree-felling programme got back under way.

Protesters gathered on Thornsett Road, in Nether Edge, this morning to campaign against the removal of street trees as part of Sheffield Council's £2.2 billion Streets Ahead contract with Amey.

South Yorkshire Police had said more officers would be present at the scene of works, but that didn't stop one campaigner scaling a tree, with photos and videos quickly circulating online.

READ MORE: Police to increase number of officers at Sheffield tree-felling sites

Police said a 48-year-old man had been arrested on suspicion of a section 4 public order offence - using threatening, abusive or insulting words or behaviour or disorderly behaviour.

A second man and a woman were also arrested, they added, on suspicion of obstructing a person acting in the execution of the Highways Act 1980.

READ MORE: Sheffield legends Jarvis Cocker and Richard Hawley team up with Everly Pregnant Brothers for tree protest show

Police said this evening that enquiries were ongoing.

The tree-felling programme was put on hold last month following clashes between protesters and workers on Meersbrook Park Road, where there were several arrests and, according to Amey, a security worker ended up with a broken wrist.

READ MORE: Tree felling works resume in Sheffield

Campaigners said they 'regretted' police having to step up resources but pledged to continue to demonstrate, with Sheffield Tree Action Groups co-chairman Chris Rust adding there was an 'awful lot of anger'.

Green Party member Natalie Bennett said she had counted 33 people in high visibility jackets and five police vans at the scene.

The council says the trees being felled and replaced are diseased, dying, damaging roads, pavements and properties or causing an obstruction.

But campaigners argue that many healthy trees could be saved using engineering solutions.