Sheffield study finds risk of heart attack increases eight fold in young smokers

Young smokers are eight times more likely to suffer a heart attack, according to a study by Sheffield Teaching Hospitals.

Tuesday, 29th November 2016, 11:07 am
Updated Tuesday, 6th December 2016, 11:40 am
Young smokers are eight times more likely to suffer a heart attack, according to a study by Sheffield Teaching Hospitals

Young smokers are eight times more likely to suffer a heart attack, according to a study by Sheffield Teaching Hospitals.

The research, which was led by the Sheffield NHS trust along with the University of Sheffield, drew on data from 1727 South Yorkshire adults undergoing treatment in the city for the most common type of heart attack between 2009 and 2012.

Sheffield Teaching Hospitals led the study into the risks

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

Almost half of the 1727 patients were current smokers, with roughly a quarter former smokers, and a quarter were non-smokers.

It found smokers under the age of 50 were eight times more likely as non-smokers to suffer a major heart attack, making them the most vulnerable of any age group of smokers.

The research also revealed current smokers tended to be '10 to 11 years younger' than ex or non-smokers when suffering a a major heart attack.

They were also three times as likely as non-smokers to have peripheral vascular disease, a condition in which a build-up of fatty deposits in the blood vessels restricts blood supply to the legs.

Sheffield Teaching Hospitals led the study into the risks

Sheffield Consultant Cardiologist Dr Ever Grech warned young smokers were 'particularly vulnerable' of a severe cardiac arrest.

"She said: “This important study, carried out at the South Yorkshire Cardiothoracic Centre in Sheffield is the first time that the increased risk of a major and life-threatening heart attack due to smoking has been quantified.

"All smokers are at much greater risk, but younger smokers are particularly vulnerable and are over eight times more likely to have a major heart attack than their non-smoking peers.

"An awareness of this strikingly higher risk is an essential public health message and could allow effective targeted intervention.

“All current smokers must be encouraged into smoking cessation therapy to reduce their risk of a I, with a focus on the youngest smokers whose increased risk is often unrecognised,”

More from The Star