`

Sheffield student working hard to fight for justice

Annie is working on the Innovation of Justice project
Annie is working on the Innovation of Justice project
0
Have your say

A Sheffield student is working hard as part of a group who are fighting for change in the current justice system, to help innocent people who have been wrongly convicted.

Annie Brodie Akers, 22, from Heeley, is the elected president of The Miscarriage of Justice Awareness Society at the University of Sheffield, and has hands on experience with helping those who have been wrongly convicted.

Annie is part of a team that are working to fight for innocent people who have been wrongly convicted

Annie is part of a team that are working to fight for innocent people who have been wrongly convicted

As a law student she is currently working on a wrongful conviction case of the University of Sheffield, and this sparked her interest into other people who have been failed by the Criminal Justice System.

She said: "I've seen the failings in the Justice system from a personal perspective, from working on this case and working on general failings that have happened."

So, she joined Liam Allan, a student from London who, in 2017 was falsely accused of rape and exonerated after it was revealed during the court case the police had failed to disclose vital evidence proving his innocence and Claire McGourlay, a Professor of Law at the University of Manchester School of Law to create the Innovation of Justice project.

They hope to help innocent people who have been wrongly convicted and resolve the issues within the CJS, and will also work closely together with the Police and Criminal Prosecution service to create a dialogue for change.

Their aim is to host conferences from November this year until July 2019, in Manchester, Cardiff and Sheffield before heading to London, where, on the last day of the conference, they will take their project to the House of Commons.

During the conferences they want to unite as many people as possible, and gather personal stories, whether they be named or anonymous, and collate them together to form evidence to take before the House of Commons.

They hope to present the information to as many Members of Parliament as possible, as well as the leading representatives from within the Crown Prosecution Service, Police and other influential stakeholders.

The project has already been backed by the University of Sheffield Law School, Sheffield Hallam University Law School and The Miscarriage of Justice Review Centre in Sheffield who have all helped with funding and support to the cause.

Other law firms, organisations and individuals have also pledged their support.

Annie said: "Our goal is to educate people to tell them that you can get wrongly convicted and to make people aware that it does happen.

"We want them to realise that they can't just brush it under the rug and that there are a lot of people who have been affected.

"We already have a huge following on social media and we want to gain more support for those who have been failed by the justice system."

The group have the backing of some local MPs including Louise Haigh, and are hoping that they will join the fight to prevent miscarriages of justice.

Once the project has enough support, their aim is to request a platform in which the Crown Prosecution Service, Police and Justice Committee agree to meet a board of representatives for miscarriages of justice, twice a year.

Then, they hope that will allow us them pitch proposals to the leading Criminal Justice System stakeholders with the power and influence to make the necessary agreed changes.

You can find more information or make a donation here.