Pollen risk rises as temperature increases - this is the pollen count where you live

By Helen Johnson
Monday, 29 April, 2019, 15:43
The current pollen forecast is high throughout Scotland and most of England (Photo: Shutterstock)

The weather of late has seen an increase in temperatures - but with this comes the rise of pollen.

In a recent tweet, the Met Office explains that the warm, dry weather is increasing the risk of pollen, particularly tree pollen.

What is pollen?

“Pollen is a fine powder made up of microscopic pollen grains,” explains the Met Office.

“Its dispersion and movement in the atmosphere is of great interest to millions of hay fever sufferers around the world.”

What is the pollen count?

The pollen count is the amount of pollen per cubic metre observed during the past 24 hours. When combined with weather conditions, this provides the pollen forecast.

The Met Office said, “It is sometimes used interchangeably with the term “pollen forecast” but the pollen count is used, along with what the weather is up to, to forecast pollen levels over the coming days.

“The 'forecast' is actually a forecast of the risk of the level of pollen over the coming days.”

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Current pollen forecast

The current pollen forecast is high throughout Scotland and most of England, with parts of the South West and Wales having a medium pollen risk.

The risk of pollen in Northern Ireland is currently low.

Warm, dry weather is increasing the risk of pollen, particularly tree pollen (Photo: Shutterstock)

Long-term forecast

The UK Met Office outlook for Friday 3 May to Sunday 12 May explains that there will be some showery rain pushing south-eastwards on Friday. This will be interspersed with brighter spells.

Colder, showery conditions will spread into the north later, with these showers turning wintry over the Scottish mountains.

“During the Bank Holiday weekend a pattern of generally dry weather is likely to develop, with some sunshine across most parts, although western and northern areas may eventually see some unsettled and windier conditions later,” adds the Met Office.

“After a cold start for many, day time temperatures are more likely to become warm again by the end of the weekend.”

This article originally appeared on our sister site, Yorkshire Evening Post