Restrictions approved for Wickersley pubs and bars in crime and anti-social behaviour crackdown

A new ‘cumulative impact zone’ has been introduced in Wickersley in a bid to tackle anti-social behaviour, crime, noise and alcohol-related ambulance call outs.

Tuesday, 9th June 2020, 10:27 am
Updated Wednesday, 10th June 2020, 9:24 am

The new policy could limit the number of new or varied alcohol licences being granted in the area, in a bid to crack down on issues created by the number of bars and pubs in the residential area.

At a virtual meeting of Rotherham Council, councillors voted to adopt the policy, which they say will ‘support Wickersley residents against low quality licensed premises applications’.

A report to the council states statistics from the police, ambulance service, environmental health and public health has demonstrated the area is ‘suffering from the cumulative impact of on and off-licensed premises’.

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The report says a number of mechanisms will be put in place to allow the council to control the impact on residents, such as considering any ‘low-quality’ applications for licensed premises, as well as the power to impose strict conditions on trading hours and noise.

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Applicants hoping to open licensed premises in Wickersley will now have to demonstrate their proposal will not add to the cumulative impact on nearby residents.

They will also be asked to consult with police, trading standards, environmental health and the children’s safeguarding board, to discuss the proposals and seek advice before they submit their application.

There are currently 19 premises within Wickersley, including 16 concentrated in a 300-metre section of Bawtry Road.

The CIZ stretches along Bawtry Road, from Wickersley School to close to Sledegate Lane at Listerdale, encompassing residential areas off Northfield Lane and either side of Morthern Road to Sorby Way and Wood Lane.

Coun Adam Carter said he was concerned about the impact of introducing such restrictions on what will be a very ‘troubled and fragile’ industry, in the wake of lockdown, which has hit the hospitality industry hard.

He said: “Over this administration’s lifetime we've seen the reduction of traffic in the nightlife industry in the town centre and one of the success stories of the borough is the up-and-coming area of Wickersley in terms of its hospitality industry.

“What we need to do as a council is not be putting unnecessary barriers in the way, particularly in the pandemic situation, and make sure we have areas that thrive.

“Wickersley is a good example of licensing policy and the hospitality industry thriving and I want to see these things move forward.”

Coun Emma Hoddinott, cabinet member for community safety, said: “By working with licensees, we can take a more preventative approach.

“It was felt there was not necessarily the infrastructure to support this kind of night-time economy in the area. I want to be clear this zone does not prevent applications in the area, nor does it ban new premises, but it does mean when they do come through that the cumulative impact of their licence on these issues must be considered.

“This zone will initially be in for three years and we'll be able to review the impact it has made.”

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