Garden extensions to be approved in bid to prevent anti-social behaviour in Rotherham

A scheme to extend a number of back gardens in a bid to seal off land which is open to “anti-social behaviour, criminal damage, arson [and] drug use” is set to be approved by councillors during a planning meeting next week.

Tuesday, 5th April 2022, 3:03 pm
Updated Tuesday, 5th April 2022, 4:46 pm

The applicant seeks retrospective permission to include land between the boundary with Roundwood Golf Course and a number of homes on Roundwood Grove, within the garden areas of the houses.

If approved, the gardens will be extended between approx. 6.5m to 9.9m in length.

Read More

Read More
Head of midwifery and chief nurse at Rotherham NHS Trust offers “heartfelt condo...

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The applicant seeks retrospective permission to include land between the boundary with Roundwood Golf Course and a number of homes on Roundwood Grove, within the garden areas of the houses.

A statement submitted by the applicant states that the land is ”presenting an area for anti-social behaviour, criminal damage, arson [and] drug use.”

A report by planning officers, to be presented to members of Rotherham Council’s planning regulatory board on April 7 states: “Liberty Steel, owners of the golf course have confirmed that the land is not within their ownership.

“16 objections have been received to the final revised plan...stating that the access is not wide enough to pass without fear of damaging vehicles, tree roots and existing fence footings or for HGV’s and the land will be used for the storage of vehicles, scaffolding and boards.”

Residents objected on the grounds that the land “should remain open at both ends for emergency vehicles”; and is “used for parking”.

RMBC also received six letters in support for the scheme, stating that “the bottom end of the lane is overgrown and not used by vehicles”; “emergency vehicles can gain access from the street”; and that it will “deter anti-social behaviour” and “prevent dumping of rubbish and illegal access to golf course”.

The officer report adds: “the area of greenspace to be enclosed comprises of a narrow slither of land adjacent to an existing residential land allocation.

“From the submitted information it appears that the land has become overgrown, untidy and supporting information from the applicant states that it has become a target for anti [social]-behaviour.

“Enclosing the land within the rear gardens helps to improve appearance of the area whilst also providing an accessible footpath and access for vehicles for the local community.

“It is accepted that it could set a precedent for further properties on the street to extend their gardens area and any further applications will be considered on their own merits.”