Cladding crisis still affecting thousands in Sheffield four years after Grenfell Tower fire

Sheffield Cladding Action Group will be joining a national protest outside Sheffield Town Hall this weekend.

Thursday, 3rd June 2021, 3:44 pm

It will be the group’s first in-person event since it was formed by leaseholders last year.

Representatives from the group will be outside the Town Hall from 11.30am on Saturday with a stall.

Olivia Hill, member of Sheffield Cladding Action Group, said thousands of people were affected by the crisis across at least 36 buildings in the city which applied for funding from the government.

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Town Hall.

She said: “It’s unbelievable that we are coming up to the four-year anniversary of Grenfell…The Grenfell inquiry is still going on and there haven’t been huge improvements, there are still buildings with ACM cladding.

“I really can’t believe that I only found out in October that my building had fire safety issues. If we had known the full extent of everything that came out, I would have known about my building and I wouldn’t have bought my flat. I bought it post-Grenfell and I had no idea until a year and a half after I bought it.

“It would be great if people who are at all concerned could get in touch with us.

“If you are living in a high-rise, even if you are not the owner, it is still scary.

“Any questions people have, just come to us and we will try our best and we can point you in the right direction. It’s horrible to go through on your own and we have all been there, we just wouldn’t want that for anybody.”

The action on Saturday is part of national protests taking place across the country.

Leaseholders say they are trapped in dangerous buildings and face huge bills to make their flats safe in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster which killed 72 people.

The government is set to miss a June deadline to complete applications for £5.1 billion of funding to remove flammable cladding.

It is understood most managing agents who administer tower blocks with the cladding are refusing to sign contracts with the government over fears it would make them liable for other fire safety defects – which is delaying work to make the buildings safe.