World Snooker Championship 2019 ‘one of the best for Sheffield’ council boss claims as tournament continues at Crucible Theatre

This year’s World Snooker Championship has already been one of the best for Sheffield – and that’s not just down to the excitement on the baize.

By The Newsroom
Tuesday, 30 April, 2019, 17:14

The tournament is continuing at the Crucible Theatre with the quarter finals due to come to an end on Wednesday and it has already seen big names such as Ronnie O’Sullivan, Mark Allen and defending champion Mark Williams crash out.

But Richard Eyre, of Sheffield Council, said the tournament would also be remembered for its impact on the city centre.

Mr Eyre, head of city centre at the council, said: “From our point of view, there is a real buzz around the city centre and Tudor Square looks fantastic.

“I think from a spectating point of view, it’s one of the biggest tournaments we’ve had. It’s certainly one of the biggest I have seen and I’ve been involved in it for 15 years.”

Sheffield has been showcased to more than 1.6 billion homes around the globe as the championship continues.

Judd Trump in action at the Crucible Theatre. Picture: Dave Howarth/PA Wire

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The council said the competition would boost the city’s economy by around £3 million but Mr Eyre said it was about much more than the economical boost.

He said: “I think the thing about the snooker is that every single year the Winter Garden is packed and people can get really close to those involved.

“You don’t get that with other sports and there's a real buzz around the Crucible when it’s on.”

The tournament comes to an end over the bank holiday weekend, with the Crucible reverting to a one-table format for the semi-finals which begin on Thursday.

John Higgins, Neil Robertson, Judd Trump, Stephen Maguire, Gary Wilson, Ali Carter, Kyren Wilson and David Gilbert have all made it through to the quarter finals.

Mr Eyre said experts at Sheffield Hallam University would be carrying out a report on the economic impact of the tournament once it concludes.