Sheffield knifemaker and florist pay beautiful tribute to little mester Stan Shaw on day of his funeral

On the day of Sheffield master cutler Stan Shaw’s funeral, two Sheffield creatives have come together to pay tribute to him in a unique way that combines both of their crafts.

Friday, 19th March 2021, 12:33 pm

After having started making knives at just 14, Stan Shaw was still working into his nineties and passed away at the end of last month.

Grace Horne, Sheffield's only female cutler and scissor-maker, moved to what is now her home city in order to learn to make the folding pocket knives for which Stan had become famous.

She has now teamed up with her florist friend to make a floral pocket knife to celebrate the work of her mentor.

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Stan Shaw worked as a self-employed cutler well into his 90s, making highly sought-after knives in his workshop at Kelham Island (he had a four-year waiting list and his blades are worth hundreds of pounds)

Grace said: "Stan was hugely inspirational in encouraging me to develop my skills to make folding knives. He was always so welcoming and supportive.

"Making this tribute on behalf on the international knife community was a truly fitting way to express our sadness, respect and admiration for Stan and his work.”

Grace turned to her Covid bubble friend and fellow creator, florist Lucy Ashton who owns The Dandelion Clock in S10.

Grace (left) and Lucy with their tribute to Stan Shaw and a selection of his knives

"When Grace first told me she wanted to make a tribute for Stan, I have to admit I didn't think she meant designing a tribute so elaborate and detailed as the folding pocket knife she had in mind," said Lucy.

"I have known Grace as a friend for more than six years, her attention detail and precision is second to none. We put our creative heads together, and collaborated on a tribute which we both believe is a worthy reflection of Stan's work.”

The tribute uses only a variety of natural dried flower and plant materials.

It incorporates delicate and iridescent honesty and skeleton leaves to reference the steel, dried grasses for the mother-of-pearl handle and dried yellow emile for the brass bolsters.

Stan Shaw worked as a self-employed cutler well into his 90s, making highly sought-after knives in his workshop at Kelham Island (he had a four-year waiting list and his blades are worth hundreds of pounds), pictured here in December 2016

Lucy selected the materials which would work and Grace put the design together. "It is always an honour to be asked to provide a sympathy tribute for anyone, and this was a truly unique and special design,” added Lucy.

"To turn delicate flowers into steel was a challenge requiring two sets of skills and a true collaboration."