Beaver Moon 2021: This is when you may be able to see it in Sheffield

The Beaver Moon, the eleventh full moon of the year, may shine brightly in some parts of the world, and those in Sheffield may be able to experience the stunning view.

Wednesday, 17th November 2021, 1:18 pm

Also known as the 'Frost Moon,' this phenomenon will occur with a partial lunar eclipse, which is said to be the longest one in nearly 600 years.

A full moon comes once a month and has gained popularity in the spiritual world as a time for negative energy to be released.

But why is November's full moon nicknamed the Beaver Moon, and when can Sheffield residents see it?

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Also known as the 'Frost Moon,' this phenomenon will occur with a partial lunar eclipse, which is said to be the longest one in nearly 600 years.

Why is it called the Beaver Moon?

The Beaver Moon is so named because beavers normally start building their winter dams in November.

The full moon occurs during a period when beavers are busy preparing for winter.

Another possibility is that November was used to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, ensuring a supply of warm winter furs.

Due to the fact that the full moon occurs during the period when winter frosts typically begin, this moon is also known as the Frost Moon.

November's full moon occurs during the start of the winter season, when temperatures begin to fall and frost begins to form.

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When can I see it in Sheffield?

According to the Royal Observatory, the Beaver Moon will peak around 8.57am on Friday, 19 November.

You will get the best view of the full moon if you get away from polluted and cloudy skies.

The best view of the full mean is when it is highest in the sky.

This is also a must-see event because it is the year's final lunar eclipse. Even better, the moon may take on a reddish hue.

How long will it last?

Lunar eclipses happen when the moon passes through the Earth's shadow.

According to Indiana's Holcomb Observatory, the partial eclipse will last three hours, 28 minutes, and 24 seconds, while the complete eclipse will last six hours and one minute.

The moon's face will be covered by 97 per cent of the Earth's shadow at maximum eclipse, according to the observatory, and will likely become a deep red colour.

The event's extended duration will provide ample opportunity to avoid clouds in order to witness the event unfold.