Five years on from the Brexit referendum, Star readers' overwhelmingly say "Yes. I'd still vote leave."

June 23 marked five years since the Brexit referendum and since that time the nation has gone through quite a bit (to say the least), we asked our readers whether they’d still vote the same way in hindsight.

Friday, 25th June 2021, 11:45 am
Updated Friday, 25th June 2021, 12:45 pm

Here are a selection of their responses:

Sam Wallace responded by saying, “Yes I would still vote to Remain. Suppliers are still blaming Brexit for issues six months on from go-live and I can’t see it getting better. Yes, the UK government have done a brilliant job with the vaccines but I think this could have happened if we had stayed in the EU - and all sorts of problems are cropping up. It never pays to be divisive.”

And another person who would vote to stay in the EU was Jonathan Jones, who replied saying, “Yes . I would definitely vote remain. The shambles of Brexit is causing untold damage to this country; import goods trapped abroad, fishing and farming lied to and seriously struggling, huge investment in infrastructure lost ; the list goes on and on yet bizarrely people still believe in a prime minister who swapped sides for power, lied to the electorate and was elected on the basis of misplaced xenophobia and a catchy sound bite. Nationalism and isolationism are hideous bedfellows!”

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LONDON, ENGLAND - MARCH 13: Pro-Brexit protesters demonstrate outside the Houses of Parliament on March 13, 2019 in London, England. Last night MPs voted 242 to 391 against British Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit deal in the second meaningful vote. They will now vote today on whether the UK should leave the EU without a deal. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - MARCH 13: Pro-Brexit protesters demonstrate outside the Houses of Parliament on March 13, 2019 in London, England. Last night MPs voted 242 to 391 against British Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit deal in the second meaningful vote. They will now vote today on whether the UK should leave the EU without a deal. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)

James Stagg said that he, “Would still vote Remain. I knew what I would get with that vote. Those that voted Leave didn't have a clue what they were voting for. We are only finding out now and I'm sure, e.g. they didn't vote to have less HGV drivers and therefore for less food to be at supermarkets.”

Jill Cooper wrote, “As a young un full of optimism I voted to join, as an older un, having had enough of empty handed wastrel EU subjects welcomed in front of skilled overseas health professionals and academics, I voted to take my bat and ball home.”

Meanwhile, Josephine Hargreaves said, “Just look at how the EU have coped with Covid and the vaccinations! Not very well, they've blamed everyone else, mostly the UK!”

Vicki Stevenson still stands by her original choice, saying; “Yes for Brexit but I will never vote conservative again after how they have handled the pandemic ! Never ever thought I would say this.”

Her thoughts were preceded by Iain Jack, who said, “Even bigger shambles than I thought possible. Yes I’d still vote remain.” Simon Turner replied to Iain, saying, “I am still awaiting my house to be worthless, food in short supply and no medicines.... oh hold on.”

Another one who stands firmly behind his original decision is Adam Brentnall, who commented by saying, “Yes, eu have shown their true colours now we've left glad to be away from them & and as for the remoaners” — there was a rude emoji there but basically he doesn’t agree with the views of those who wish to remain.

A couple were non-plussed by it all, like Seán Stones who said, “Not really made any difference tbh”. And some others said they would change their vote now, as was the case with Thomas Bell, who commented; “I voted to remain. But now I would vote to leave the EU. Britain made a good decision to leave, because Germany are just trying to control Europe in a financial way.”

Overall, the response seemed to be very much in favour of leaving five years on, if anything the last five years has firmed the resolve of others and changed the minds of many others in light of the treatment from the EU. One of the key drivers in such a fervent feeling that we were right to leave was the nations vaccination programme and the success of that.

Unfortunately, we couldn’t feature all of the responses here but you can read them on our Facebook page here, as well as on Twitter.