No plans to return Sheffield's missing war memorial to city

A Sheffield war memorial which hasn't been seen in public for more than a decade is to remain in storage, council chiefs have said.

Tuesday, 9th January 2018, 9:55 am
Updated Tuesday, 9th January 2018, 10:00 am
The Crimean War memorial when it was situated in the Botanical Gardens.

The city's memorial to men killed in the Crimean War used to stand on The Moor and was moved to the Botanical Gardens in 1960.

But the grade-II listed monument was removed when the gardens were restored and has now been in storage for nearly 15 years - and the council has said it does not have the funds to return it to public view.

The monument was moved from Sheffield city centre to the Botanical Gardens before being removed from display completely.

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A spokesman for Sheffield City Council said: “Repair work to the Crimean Monument was carried out and it was placed into safe storage when it was removed during the restoration of the Botanical Gardens some years ago.

“To date neither a suitable new location nor the funding to reinstate the monument have been identified. This is a very large monument, which will need careful siting. However, the monument is being stored safely and is available to be displayed in future."

In the past, campaigners have called for the memorial to be put back on show.

Four years ago, the South Yorkshire branch of The Victorian Society called on the council to re-erect the memorial - which was paid for by the people of Sheffield.

The monument was moved from Sheffield city centre to the Botanical Gardens before being removed from display completely.

In 2014 spokesman Victoria Bayliss, branch chairman, said: “This was a monument to the people of Sheffield who fell in the Crimean War and was erected by subscription.

“We understand why the authority took the memorial out of the Botanical Gardens, but they should put it back.

“If you think about the Women of Steel statue, which is almost paid for, you wouldn’t think that in a few decades the council might take it out when it’s no longer convenient.”