Mourners tuck into ice creams at funeral of much-loved former Sheffield publican

A former Sheffield pub landlord was given a sweet send-off as mourners tucked into ice creams at his funeral.

Thursday, 30th November 2017, 3:35 pm
Updated Tuesday, 12th December 2017, 9:46 am
Anthony Gillott was a good friend of the Granelli family, who run the famous Sheffield ice cream business

Anthony Gillott, who lived for most of his life in Manor Top, came from a family of publicans and worked as a teenager at The Lord Nelson pub on Broad Street, in the city centre.

He went on to run his own pub - The Mail Coach, on West Street, in what is now The Wick at Both Ends - during the late 70s and 80s.

Anthony Gillott died on November 5 this year, aged 76

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There, claims his son Jonathan, he showed his business savvy by becoming the first publican in the city to offer customers meals along with their drinks.

Mr Gillott, who also ran his own glazing firm and worked in the steel, construction and plumbing trades during a long and varied career, died of pneumonia on November 5, aged 76 - 'going out with a bang' on Bonfire Night, as his family put it.

His funeral at City Road Cemetery last Friday was not a solemn occasion but a celebration of the 'jovial' and much-loved character, who his son said went out of his way to help his many friends.

Mr Gillott, who Jonathan said knew how to enjoy life, would surely have been delighted to see those gathered savouring cones dished out by Granelli's, one of Sheffield's oldest ice cream sellers.

A Granelli's ice cream cart outside The Lord Nelson pub, where Anthony Gillott worked as a young man

The company took a van to the funeral as a tribute to Mr Gillott, whom owner Rosita Granelli-Hunt remembers playing with as a child at her family's shop on Broad Street, beside The Lord Nelson.

The celebrations continued at the home of his ex-wife Annette, with whom he remained close friends, where old friends and family wolfed down the famous meat and potato pies once served by Mr Gillett at The Mail Coach.

"It was a lovely funeral and I think Dad would definitively have approved of having an ice cream van there," said Jonathan.

"He was an excellent father who loved his family to bits and had lots of friends, who will always remember him as a jovial man who liked to play jokes on people but was always helping people.

The ice cream van which attended the funeral

"He didn't do badly given he had the most unhealthy lifestyle imaginable. He would drink two bottles of wine a day, smoke 70 cigarettes and eat the fattiest foods known to man."

Mr Gillott was a keen gardener and angler, who asked for his ashes to be scattered at Forest Lock, in Nottinghamshire, which was his favourite fishing spot.

Anthony Gillott died on November 5 this year, aged 76
A Granelli's ice cream cart outside The Lord Nelson pub, where Anthony Gillott worked as a young man
The ice cream van which attended the funeral