Memorial to Sheffield star Marti Caine set for much-needed renovation

Marti Caine enjoying lunch at Lowedges Junior School, where she was invited by Tina Wild in 1982
Marti Caine enjoying lunch at Lowedges Junior School, where she was invited by Tina Wild in 1982
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A memorial to the Sheffield-born comedian and cabaret singer Marti Caine is set for a much-needed facelift.

The New Faces star died two weeks before she was due to unveil the 'Sheen' sculpture at the junction of Howard Street and Arundel Gate in 1995, and Mick Farrell's artwork was subsequently dedicated to her.

The Marti Caine memorial sculpture at the junction of Arundel Gate and Howard Street in Sheffield city centre

The Marti Caine memorial sculpture at the junction of Arundel Gate and Howard Street in Sheffield city centre

Readers have pointed out how more than 20 years on the sandstone and stainless steel monument, loosely resembling a giant waffle, is looking rather the worse for wear.

READ MORE: Remembering Sheffield's consummate showstopper and charity champion Marti Caine

The stone is chipped and cracked in places, and several of the steel plates designed to reflect the weather and passing traffic are missing.

Sheffield Hallam University, which commissioned the sculpture and is responsible for its upkeep, has now revealed renovation work is imminent.

Mark Swales, Sheffield Hallam University's director of estates and facilities, said: "We will be carrying out maintenance work on the monument over the summer.”

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Sheffield historian Ron Clayton had been among those to highlight what he called the 'deplorable condition' of the artwork, which stands close to the university's main entrance in the city centre.

Caine rose from a working class background to establish her as one of the nation's best-loved entertainers.

She grew up in Shiregreen and her vocal talents, wit and engaging personality made her a mainstay of the Sheffield club circuit before she leapt to national prominence by winning the TV talent show New Faces in 1975 - a programme she went on to present with great success.

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In her later years, she campaigned tirelessly on behalf of cancer charities before succumbing to lymphatic cancer on November 4, 1995, aged 50, after a long illness.

She was awarded an honorary doctorate by Sheffield Hallam University in recognition of her contribution to the world of entertainment, and the film Funny Cow, starring Maxine Peake, was loosely based on her compelling life story.

The statue dedicated to her, which is often referred to simply as 'Marti', was one of the pieces made for the Stone City Symposium of 1995.

Describing his work at the time, its creator said: "Using stainless steel and stone I hope to set up a contradiction within the nature of both materials. This architectural piece would act both as a landmark and a point to view from."