‘I’ll be as popular as a f**t in a greenhouse but things need to change’ – Why former Sheffield United footballer is standing to be a councillor

Former Sheffield United footballer Curtis Woodhouse has announced he intends to stand for election on Driffield Town Council.

Tuesday, 12th March 2019, 7:41 am
Updated Tuesday, 12th March 2019, 7:48 am
Curtis Woodhouse in action for Sheffield United in 2000. Picture: Shaun Flannery.

The former Blades’ midfielder, who lives in East Yorkshire, announced he was filling in an application to stand as an independent councillor in this year’s local elections in May.

Woodhouse, aged 38, made more than 100 appearances for United before going on to compete as a light-welterweight boxer, becoming British champion in 2012.

Curtis Woodhouse in action for Sheffield United in 2000. Picture: Shaun Flannery.

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He now runs the Curtis Woodhouse Elite Boxing Academy in Driffield and said that after a candidate failed to act on a pre-election pledge to work with the gym, he wanted to stand himself.

Posting on Facebook, Woodhouse said: “When I opened my gym six months ago, I think it coincided with the local election in Driffield and I was approached by somebody running and told what a fantastic idea it was to open a local boxing gym and it’s something the town had needed for ages.

“She was all for the kids having more to do and asked if I would get behind her campaign so I agreed to let this politician use me in her manifesto to try get some votes as I liked what she said and she would be trying to help the kids in our area get better opportunities.

“She said if she was elected she was keen to work closely with me to see if we could really make a positive change for the next generation.

“The politician got elected, which was great, we could hopefully now start to do something positive and, with a local politician in our corner, I was hopeful the project to help the kids in Driffield and surrounding areas could really move forward quickly.

“Six months have gone by and I haven’t heard a thing. Reasons like this are reasons I’m looking to get on the council. I’ll be as popular as a f**t in a greenhouse but I’m not bothered – it’s not good enough and things need to change.”