‘Excessive’ sentences handed to three teens for their part in Sheffield nightclub violence cut

The Viper Rooms, Carver Street. Picture: Andrew Roe
The Viper Rooms, Carver Street. Picture: Andrew Roe

Three teenagers who were locked up for their part in ‘ugly’ late night violence outside a Sheffield nightclub have had their sentences cut by judges.

The trio took part in a serious attack on a clubber, who was assaulted repeatedly after leaving The Viper Rooms after a night out last October.

The victim was punched, kicked and knocked to the floor, and had his mobile phone stolen by one of the attackers, Kent Di-Nitto, 19.

Di-Nitto, alongside Blayne Scarborough and Mason Thomas, both 19, admitted assault occasioning actual bodily harm.

Di-Nitto also admitted theft and Scarborough assaults by beating of a friend of the victim and a police officer.

The pair were sentenced to two years' youth custody, while Thomas got a year and eight months at Sheffield Crown Court in May.

Today, senior judges in London slashed the ‘excessive’ terms, but rejected their plea for their sentences to be suspended to let them go free.

Ruling on the case at the Court of Appeal, Mr Justice Kerr said he had watched CCTV footage of the attack.

It showed a group attack, including kicks which ‘could have caused much more serious injury than mercifully was caused’, he said.

"The sentencing judge considered the issue of suspending sentences and we agree he was right to reject that suggestion," he added.

"This was town centre violence, late at night, with ugly features."

The court heard all three of the teenagers had no previous convictions and had acted out of character.

Di-Nitto, of Hardcastle Gardens, Woodhouse, punched the victim in a first assault and joined in again when he was followed and attacked again.

Scarborough, of Wharncliffe Side village, ‘kicked and kneed’ the victim, punched his friend to the jaw and struck a police officer.

Thomas, of Beaver Hill Road, Woodhouse, was involved in the initial attack outside the club.

Their lawyers claimed in today's appeal their sentences were too long and should have been suspended.

Despite ruling that the crown court judge was right to lock them up, Mr Justice Kerr said the total sentences received were too tough.

Di-Nitto and Scarborough had their overall terms cut to 13 months and Thomas saw his reduced to 12 months.