Doncaster man embarked on dangerous, 20-minute police chase 'out of loyalty to his dog,' court told

A Doncaster man embarked on a dangerous police chase lasting 20 minutes 'out of loyalty to his dog,' a court heard.
A Doncaster man embarked on a dangerous police chase lasting 20 minutes 'out of loyalty to his dog,' a court heard.
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A Doncaster man embarked on a dangerous police chase lasting 20 minutes 'out of loyalty to his dog,' a court heard.

During a hearing at Sheffield Crown Court on Wednesday, Recorder Taryn Turner sentenced defendant, David Rush, to six months in prison, suspended for 12 months, for the dangerous driving incident on September 16 this year.

Prosecuting, Louise Gallagher, told the court how at around 3.10am that morning, patrolling police officers became suspicious of a van being driven by Rush after they noticed it had 'front-end damage and its airbags had been deployed'.

A marked police car was sent out to investigate the matter further, and after seeing Rush, of Mallin Drive, Edlington drive at speeds of between 45 and 50 miles per hour (mph) in a 40 zone, officers turned on their sirens and gestured for him to pull over.

"He sped off instead, and was seen driving at speeds of 70mph on Leger Way," said Ms Gallagher.

Police then pursued 33-year-old Rush for around 20 minutes as he continued to break the speed limit on several roads, drove the wrong way around roundabouts and into the path of oncoming traffic.

Ms Gallagher told the court that the chase came to an end when Rush drove into a cul-de-sac, slowed down and had his car blocked in by a police car.

Rush made no attempt to escape, and was arrested at the scene.

He pleaded guilty to one count of dangerous driving.

Defending, Richard Adams, told the court that at the time of the offence Rush had found himself homeless and was living in the hire van police found him driving that had been damaged earlier that evening by an unknown driver.

"His motivation for driving off was simply that he had with him his dog, the only stable factor in his life, a Staffy-cross and because he believed it was an illegal dangerous breed out of loyalty to his dog he drove off," said Mr Adams, adding: "He accepts the utter stupidity of the events of that evening."

In addition to his suspended sentence, Recorder Turner also ordered Rush to complete 100 hours of unpaid work and disqualified him from driving for 12-months, after which time he will be required to take an extended driving test before getting behind the wheel again.