XL bully dog attack: More injuries in Sheffield as another dog attack reported to police

An XL bully has been seized by the police after another dog attack in which a member of the public was seriously injured in Sheffield.
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South Yorkshire Police said that on Thursday night officers were alerted to a dog attack on Labernum Grove, Stocksbridge.

The force said that an XL bully escaped from its home and attacked another dog being walked in the street.

American XL Bullys will be added to the UK's list of banned dogs after a recent rise in fatalities and other attacks allegedely involving the breed. Picture by Lauren HallAmerican XL Bullys will be added to the UK's list of banned dogs after a recent rise in fatalities and other attacks allegedely involving the breed. Picture by Lauren Hall
American XL Bullys will be added to the UK's list of banned dogs after a recent rise in fatalities and other attacks allegedely involving the breed. Picture by Lauren Hall
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Injuries were sustained by somebody who attempted to intervene, but it is not clear from the police statement whether this was the owner of the XL bully or the dog which was set upon.

The force said: "We received a call reporting an XL Bully attacking another dog on Labernum Grove in Sheffield. It is believed the dog escaped from its home and attacked an innocent dog being walked along the street.

"The owner attempted to intervene and suffered significant injuries, requiring hospital treatment."

The XL bully was seized.

South Yorkshire Police said the attack came just eight minutes after another dog was seized in an incident in Denaby Main, Doncaster.

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In that incident, at 10.20pm on Thursday, September 21, officers were called to Harlington Crescent following "reports of a woman using her mastiff-type dog to cause fear and harm towards a man".

A 37-year-old woman was arrested on suspicion of offences under the Dangerous Dogs Act and the dog was seized.

Following the seizure of two dogs in that same night, police chiefs are urging the public to understand the risk dangerous dogs pose to their owners, other people and officers attending incidents.

South Yorkshire Police said: "While our officers put themselves at risk to protect others; the situations they are responding to cannot be ignored, but they can often be prevented.

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"We remain eager to protect our communities and are urging dog owners to be responsible, and for those with concerns to get in touch. Reducing risk and preventing injury remains our priority.

Dog Legislation Officer PC Paul Jameson said: "We’re continuing to see an increase in incidents involving dogs being out of control, or causing fear, and without action, and we fear it is only a matter of time until we experience another fatality within South Yorkshire.

"We’re urging dog owners of all breeds to up their efforts in keeping everyone safe. Please stop thinking ‘my dog wouldn’t do that’, ‘my dog wouldn’t bite my child’. This can happen to anyone. 

"During this month, we have already seen several children requiring hospital treatment for attacks by their own family pets, innocent dog walkers being left with serious injuries by loose dogs and officers suffering injury during their response."

The force has issued the following advice:

  • Always supervise your dog and children, pay attention to what is happening so you can intervene at the earliest opportunity
  • Encourage gentle stroking, do not allow children to pull, grab or sit on the dog
  • Do not allow children near your dog if it is eating, sleeping, or with items that belong to him/her such as toys
  • If you see that your dog is becoming worried or agitated, or the child is becoming frightened, then intervene and provide a safe space for each of them to have some time alone
  • Plan your walk, you know your dog. If they are likely to become stressed in large crowds and busy areas, walk them in the morning or evening and avoid public parks and paths
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PC Jameson added: "Although we are seeing an increase in incidents, we are also seeing many victims who do not wish to prosecute and support a police investigation.

"I would like to reassure you that we do not put all dogs we seize to sleep. If there is no risk to the public, where possible we work with the owner, alongside charities, including the Blue Cross, to refer owners onto a responsible dog ownership course and put measures in place to reduce risk.

"Of the dogs we seize, we take into consideration the reason why it has been brought to our attention and, where possible, work with charities and rehoming centres.

"If anyone has concerns about a dog in the community, please do not hesitate to get in touch."