Sword, catapult and 32 knives among weapons dropped in Sheffield knife bin

Nearly 40 weapons, including a sword, catapult and 32 knives, have been found in a Sheffield knife bin.

By Robert Cumber
Thursday, 11 April, 2019, 10:06

Dozens of used syringes were also dropped into the secure container in Burngreave, which last year became the first knife bin to be installed in South Yorkshire.

The charity which installed the knife bank and the church on whose grounds it is situated both say they are delighted with its success so far.

Weapons found in the knife bin in Burngreave (pic: Rock Christian Centre / Word 4 Weapons)

Rock Christian Centre has announced it is funding the bin for a further two years and is talking to other churches about getting a second one in the city.

The charity Word 4 Weapons, which manages the bin, says taking so many weapons off the streets may have helped save someone’s life.

The bin is located outside the church's Light Centre, for people in crisis, on Handley Street close to Spital Hill, and was funded for the first year by the Office of the South Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner.

When it was first emptied last year, just five knives were found, but this time there were 32 knives, a sword, two air guns, a  police-style baton and a catapult, along with dozens of discarded drugs needles, inside.

Rock Christian Centre’s assistant pastor Paul Hunt said: “I’m very glad people know it’s there and are using it to get rid of weapons, making our streets safer.

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“This was the first Word 4 Weapons knife bin to be installed in the north. We as a church have now provided the funding to ensure it stays in place for at least another two years, and I’m in talks with other churches around Sheffield to see if we can get another one.

“Knife crime does seem to have reduced in the area over the last year but it’s important we keep trying to get the message across that you’re more likely to be injured by a weapon if you’re carrying one. There are lots of different agencies doing good work to educate people about the dangers of carrying a knife.

“The bin has a number people can call or text to get a resource pack helping them make better decisions if they’re in a hard place.”

Word 4 Weapons founder Michael Smith said he was glad the bin was being well-used.

“Our bins make a difference wherever they go because the community generally feels safer knowing there’s somewhere people can safely and securely dispose of knives and weapons,” he added.

“If we collect just one knife, that’s potentially one life saved.”