Bishop of Sheffield reserves seats for the war dead at dramatic project launch

The fallen of two world wars came back from the dead as part of the launch of a brand new history project that was unveiled as part of WW1 100 Years Remembrance at the weekend.
The fallen of two world wars came back from the dead as part of the launch of a brand new history project that was unveiled as part of WW1 100 Years Remembrance at the weekend.
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The fallen of two world wars came back from the dead as part of the launch of a brand new history project that was unveiled as part of WW1 100 Years Remembrance at the weekend.

The eerie silhouette of WW1 soldiers marching to their deaths lit up the side of historic St Nicholas’ Church in High Bradfield whilst ‘There But Not There’ ghost-like Tommies – lifesize and made of see-through Perspex - sat amongst the congregation at a packed service presided over by the Bishop of Sheffield.

Key soldiers from the area – including Stannington-born Heber Joseph Revitt who became famous after being chosen to blow the ‘last post all clear’ outside the train carriage at Compiegne where the agreement was signed to end WW1 – also paid a surprise visit to the event via actors from the local Stannington Players.

The event – the start of a two week long WW1 100 Years Remembrance – also marked the official unveiling of a Heritage Lottery-funded project to uncover the secrets of the Dungworth and Bradfield area in World War Two.

A specially commissioned ‘Parish Poppy’ sculpture made of spent ammunition shells was also on view for the first time, together with artwork from local schools, and the Bradfield parish magazines of 1918.

Guests included the Lord Lieutenant of South Yorkshire, Andrew Coombe, and the Deputy Lord Mayor of Sheffield, Councillor Tony Downing.

Local army and navy cadets and children from nearby Bradfield Dungworth Primary School also helped with the event in stewarding and welcoming capacities.

Months in the planning, the dramatic remembrance event also included a gun salute, bugler, church bells ringing, and be the start of two weeks of events and activity.

A cascade of poppies made by dementia and Alzheimer patients from Northern General Hospital will also be installed in the church for Remembrance Sunday on 11th November.