How negative views on videogames is leading to success for Sheffield museum

Sheffield's National Videogame Museum has welcomed 2,500 visitors in just two weeks as it enjoys a busy start to the school summer holidays.

By Gita Juniku
Monday, 12 August, 2019, 09:26
Ryan Johnson and Finley Cocker, both nine, pictured trying out Platform 14, one of two new exhibits currently on at the National Videogame Museum. Picture: Marie Caley NSST-29-05-19-VideogameMuseum-7

The Angel Street venue has proudly released the figures as it aims to banish recent speculation about videogames.

By launching it’s new family-friendly summer programme, Summer of Buttons, The National Videogame Museum has seen thousands pass through its doors.

Conor Clarke, Marketing and Communications Manager said: “There has been a bit of negative discussion relating to videogames recently, which has only reaffirmed our mission to create an accessible and inclusive space for those who love videogames.

Sheffield Castle Virtual Reailty Exhibition at the National Videogame Museum,Castle House,Angel St,Sheffield…….Pic Steve Ellis

“That we’re currently busier than we’ve ever been demonstrates that the public is eager to learn about videogame culture, and discover the educational and cultural value of games.”

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Since launching in November 2018, the museum has attracted national attention as the UK’s home of videogame culture and has now exceeded expectations in terms of visitor numbers and positive feedback due to their family-friendly summer programme.

Summer Buttons has been a hit with families with games like 4-Player Pac-Man - a bespoke version of the arcade classic made to be played by a team.

The Button Bash Bundle, which has seen guests vying to set the fastest time in various athletic-based video games getting visitors involved and having fun.

Head of Marketing Emma Cooper and Jane Sheilds (project co-ordinator ) at the new National Videogame Museum which has opened in Sheffield. Picture Scott Merrylees