The health checks helping people in Sheffield who are at risk of developing heart disease

Almost half of people aged 40 to 74 are at risk of developing heart disease but health checks in Sheffield are picking up on potential problems in advance, a report has said.

Wednesday, 19th February 2020, 11:45 am
Updated Monday, 24th February 2020, 5:28 pm

The checks are offered once every five years to people living in the city who may be at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease, diabetes, kidney disease and stroke.

Cardiovascular disease is common and being at risk of it does not mean people will definitely develop it – but the checks mean people can get an early indication if they are at risk and need to change their lifestyle.

They are not a perfect predictor but give people a warning sign so they can get help with things such as smoking, alcohol, weight management and exercise.

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Director of Public Health, Greg Fell,

They also aim to raise awareness of the warning signs of dementia.

Around 7,500 Sheffielders per year are receiving the checks, although people in their 70s are more likely to take up the offer than people who are in their 40s.

Director of Public Health, Greg Fell, says in a report: “We estimate that approximately 43 per cent of the eligible population are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. It has been our aim in Sheffield to reduce health inequalities.

“This programme is important as it can prevent or delay the onset of developing cardiovascular disease therefore promoting a longer healthier life.

“For people who feel fit and well and didn’t realise that they may have underlying risks this programme gives the opportunity for these risks to be identified and managed.

“One of the aims is to improve the health of those living in the most deprived areas of Sheffield and this programme will contribute to this. We have a targeted approach and aim to deliver the programme to those who are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease.”

The health checks are offered to an equal amount of men and women.

Typically, more women tend to take up offers like this, and although this is true here, the difference is less than usual.