Sheffield care home boss launches Support Care Home Heroes to help under-pressure care workers

Sheffield care home boss Nicola Richards has launched a major bid to help under-pressure care workers.

Ms Richards, who runs Palms Row Health Care, on Earl Marshal Road, and chairs Sheffield Care Association, has unveiled Support Social Care Heroes and applied for charity status.

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It will support social care workers and recognise their dedication and personal sacrifices.

Newfield Nursing Home, Sheffield, April 2020. Eleven residents at the 60 bed home have died from coronavirus and the company which runs this and two otrher care homes has 36 staff who have also tested positive and another 31 who are self-isolating. See SWNS story SWLEcare. These moving behind-the-scenes photos reveal a rare glimpse of day-to-day life inside a care home devastated by coronavirus. The images give the clearest look yet at how dedicated key workers are tirelessly caring for some of the most vulnerable people in British society. They emerge the day after the government finally announced that all care home residents and staff in England will be able to access tests, regardless of whether they have symptoms. Latest figures revealed a third of all coronavirus deaths are now happening in care homes, with a grim figure of 2,000 given for the week ending April 17.

Donations will raise funds to support care workers, enabling a better work/life balance, improved resilience, fewer acute cases through stress, and eliminating chronic long-term illness whenever possible and retaining talent within the sector to help the current staffing crisis.

She says carers often work long, anti-social hours and don’t often get the recognition and rewards they deserve.

Ms Richards said: “We’re facing a precipice in social care and Support for Social Care Heroes is building a bridge to a future in which those who need care, and those caring for them, are valued by society.

"The care sector loses its best people every week. Our organisation aims to end this revolving door for employees by bringing greater meaning to their role and supporting employers to make meaningful, long-term changes to their circumstances.

Jack Dodsley, 79, with a carer in full PPE at Newfield Nursing Home, Sheffield, April 2020. Eleven residents at the 60 bed home have died from coronavirus and the company which runs this and two otrher care homes has 36 staff who have also tested positive and another 31 who are self-isolating. See SWNS story SWLEcare. These moving behind-the-scenes photos reveal a rare glimpse of day-to-day life inside a care home devastated by coronavirus. The images give the clearest look yet at how dedicated key workers are tirelessly caring for some of the most vulnerable people in British society. They emerge the day after the government finally announced that all care home residents and staff in England will be able to access tests, regardless of whether they have symptoms. Latest figures revealed a third of all coronavirus deaths are now happening in care homes, with a grim figure of 2,000 given for the week ending April 17.

“Our country’s social care heroes have been on the front line and in the headlines for over 18 months and, though there is more public recognition for the amazing work they do, they are overworked, underpaid and lacking support.

“While the sector continues to fight for fair wages and conditions for carers, Support Social Care Heroes aims to fill a gap by improving the wellbeing of these vital workers and show them that they are valued. It’s time to care for our social care heroes.”

Laura Hibbard, care manager at Westbourne House in Sheffield, added: “The last 18 months have been so tough for everyone in the care sector. Care home residents across the country have shown unimaginable resilience throughout the pandemic but the people who care for them are mentally, emotionally and physically exhausted.

“No one becomes a carer for the money, we do it to improve the lives of vulnerable people. It can be a hugely rewarding experience but it can also be extremely difficult at times. Carers often feel forgotten so I think it’s wonderful that SSCH is being established to acknowledge the crucial role they play in our society.”