This Sheffield school's science work is creating some real excitement

A teacher from Sheffield has won funding for an exciting science investigation with students, as the school clinched a top award for its work and collaboration in science and engineering.

By Sally Burton
Monday, 22 July, 2019, 12:39
Winning team from Tapton

Dr Nick Harris from Tapton School has won £15,000 to launch a school-based investigation to discover new antibiotic medicines.

The project aims to help spark a love of science in students, as part of the annual Let Teachers SHINE competition.

This scheme, run by the charity SHINE and supported by The Times Educational Supplement, offers funding to teachers with brilliant ideas to help disadvantaged children succeed in English, maths or science.

Nick's project will involve students aged 10 to 18 years from right across Sheffield.

Primary pupils will use a Swab and Send initiative to discover microbes that produce antimicrobial compounds in their schools.

The microbes they isolate will be analysed by students in secondary schools as part of GCSE and A-Level study.

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Then students will publish their findings establishing them as authentic research scientists.

Nick who leads Students Science Research across the Tapton School Academy Trust said: “With this funding we can get kids engaged in real science, opening the door to careers in science technology engineering and maths.

“As an extra bonus we may just even find the next generation of antibiotics solving the global crisis of antimicrobial resistance."

Tapton School Academy Trust and Fields of Learning gained the title of Science, Technology and Engineering Team of the Year at the Tes Schools Awards 2019.

Science education there is, said the lead judge, “simply fantastic”.

The science department has 20 specialist teachers, with a researcher,and aims to function as a university faculty does, where teaching sits alongside research and discussion.