Sheffield school links with Nepal to prepare students for life and work within a global economy

A primary school in Sheffield has made a link with a secondary in Nepal as part of a programme to give students the knowledge to live and work within a global economy.

By Alana Roberts
Monday, 24 June, 2019, 11:23
Greystones Primary pupils Winnie Hunt, Megan Phillips, Alfie asquith and Joesph Rossiter pictured with Nepalese teacher Ram Parjuli

Greystones Primary School, in Banner Cross, forged the partnership with Shree Ambika Secondary School in Pokhara, Nepal, as part of the British Council’s global education programme, Connecting Classrooms through Global Learning.

Staff and students welcomed Ram Chandra Parajuli, of Shree Ambika, to Greystones Primary for a five-day exchange visit to share insights and ideas on how to improve teaching and global learning in their schools.

Shree Ambika and Greystones Primary are taking part because of their commitment to preparing young people to make a positive contribution to their world and for sharing best practice around teaching and approaches to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. 

Students are working with their peers in Nepal, via a blog and skype sessions on projects such around air pollution, clean water and recycling and others including an enterprise project linked to Sustainable Development Goal 8, Decent Work and Economic Growth.

During the visit, Mr Parajuli, a link teacher for international learning, observed and analysed the teaching of different subjects.

He also joined staff at their homes where he was able to sample some British cuisine and, as Nepal is a landlocked country, was taken to Scarborough so he could experience the beach. 

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Chris Jennings, Headteacher of Greystones Primary School and Ram Chandra Parajuli from Shree Ambika Secondary School said: “We aim to ensure that our pupils are creative and critical thinkers, equipped with the knowledge, skills, understanding needed to grow in to adults who are able to operate on a global level, aware that all areas of the world are interlinked and that we are all, jointly, responsible for the sustainability of our world.”

Mr Jennings added: “Teachers are very much looking forward to the partnership, sharing their practice with and learning from teachers operating over 5000 miles away.

“In the future we aim to further embed our links through more joint planning and shared delivery focused on sustainable development and the global learning goals.

“We have already started sharing teaching resources, Shree Ambika provided us with a fantastic presentation on recycling, and we have carried out joint research in to water usage.”

Connecting Classrooms is run in over 30 countries by the British Council in partnership with the Department for International Development (DFID). 

In November, two members of staff from Greystones Primary will visit Shree Ambika Secondary School in Nepal, as part of the continued work.