Sheffield primary pupils to plant hundreds of trees in bid to help environment

Students at an eco-conscious Sheffield school are taking part in a tree planting scheme in a bid to help the environment and improve their school woodland area.

Thursday, 5th December 2019, 12:09 pm
Updated Thursday, 19th December 2019, 9:58 am
Pupils from Dore Primary School taking part in planting over 460 trees. Pic Steve Ellis.

As part of its commitment to outdoor and forest school learning, Dore Primary School has secured a total of 460 trees to expand its existing green space on Kings Croft and help support students learn about environmental issues.

The trees, which are all species native to the UK, will be planted from December 10 – potentially tripling the size of the current woodland area.

Students will be given the opportunity to plant one sapling each and it is hoped that older children will support the younger ones with hole digging.

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Pupils from Dore Primary School taking part in planting over 460 trees. Pic Steve Ellis.

Assistant headteacher Jason Fletcher said: “The Big Tree Plant is an opportunity for each child in school to plant their own tree and contribute to the development of the current woodland on Kings Croft. The trees are a mixture of native species and have been sourced from the Woodland Trust and the Local Parks and Ranger Service who will also be supporting with equipment and advice.

“The kids will also learn about the legacy they’re leaving for the school by planting the trees. They’re all environmentally conscious and have been learning about carbon capture and have a concern for the environment.”

Before planting the trees, students took part in assemblies to learn about the devastating implications of deforestation, the preservation of woodland and the benefits that planting new trees has on the environment so they had a deeper understanding of how the new woodland would help the surrounding environment.

Mr Fletcher added: “The key message has been that trees change lives. They help combat climate change, they improve our air quality, they provide new habitats for wildlife and improve our well-being through outdoor activity, play, and learning.”

Pupils from Dore Primary School taking part in planting over 460 trees. Pic Steve Ellis.

Once complete, students will have scheduled time in the woodland in which they will be able to watch the trees grow, learn about the different types of wildlife, and take part in activities such as bug hunts.

It is hoped the young woodland will also support the habitat development of the endangered Willow Tit which has been sighted close to the area.

Pupils from Dore Primary School taking part in planting over 460 trees. Pic Steve Ellis.
Pupils from Dore Primary School taking part in planting over 460 trees. Pic Steve Ellis.