Sheffield architects helping to create Nightingale Hospital in Harrogate

Sheffield architects are helping the NHS and British Army convert Harrogate Convention Centre into a 500-bed Nightingale Hospital.

By David Walsh
Sunday, 12th April 2020, 12:53 pm
Updated Wednesday, 15th April 2020, 11:27 am

BDP is working with clinicians, consultants, contractors and soldiers to deliver the emergency facility, one of several to combat the coronavirus pandemic.

The company, which has an office at 3 St Paul’s Place in the city centre, produced an ‘instruction manual’ on how to set up a Nightingale after its involvement in the first at the ExCel Centre in London, which is now receiving patients.

BDP, architect director Mihalis Walsh said: “These hospitals are a result of exceptional collaboration in truly unprecedented circumstances.

Sheffield architects are helping the NHS and British Army convert Harrogate Convention Centre into a 500-bed Nightingale Hospital.

“To deliver this number of beds in emergency conditions requires all teams to make rapid decisions so design and construction can take place in parallel.

“At Harrogate, the exhibition halls vary in shape and size, requiring bed bay configuration plans and ward facilities to be adjusted for each floor.

“BDP clinical planners have been instrumental in tackling the challenges that this has presented.

“The British Army and BDP have also been sharing their expertise and knowledge of designing for effective infection control. The whole process has taken two weeks.

“People are all too aware of the need for these projects to be completed in the time allocated and all of our teams have been working tirelessly to ensure that this happens.”

Founded in Preston, UK in 1961, BDP now have studios across the UK, Ireland, Netherlands, India, and China.

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