CN Tower Sheffield: Grantside developers reduce height of planned £17m Charles Street offices after complaints

Developers have lopped three stories off designs for a new office block in Sheffield city centre after complaints over the height.

Friday, 3rd December 2021, 10:44 am

Grantside says ‘CN Tower’ would also have more glass and ‘green’ living walls to improve its appearance.

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The company has re-submitted plans for a block on the corner of Charles and Norfolk streets after overwhelming opposition.

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Developers have lopped three stories off designs for a new CN Tower office block on Charles Street in Sheffield city centre in response to complaints it would block natural light, destroy privacy and damage businesses

WHY IS GRANTSIDE SO KEEN TO BUILD ON THIS PLOT?

It wants to build a £17m seven-storey structure with shops on the ground floor. It says the supply of Grade ‘A’ offices is at an historic low.

Critics claimed the original plans for a 10-storey building would have blocked natural light, destroyed privacy and damaged businesses.

The company wants to build a £17m, seven-storey block with shops on the ground floor. It says the supply of Grade ‘A’ offices is at an historic low.

Steve Davis, managing director of Grantside, said it had listened to feedback.

He added: “These major amendments address comments received and still deliver an exemplary office development of the highest quality in the heart of Sheffield, which is sensitive to its surroundings.

“Grade ‘A’ offices on this site provide potential blue-chip occupiers with an option for office accommodation in Sheffield city centre.

The original design: Grantside has re-submitted plans for ‘CN Tower’ on the corner of Charles and Norfolk streets after the first met with overwhelming opposition.

“Bringing further office workers into the city is vitally important to Sheffield’s future long-term economic growth.”

The building would replace two office blocks from the 1960s and 70s. The plans ignited a debate about whether ‘city living’ or ‘city working’ should prevail.

WHO WERE THE OBJECTORS?

In August, objectors claimed 40 apartments in St Paul’s Chambers, Berona House and Waterhouse would lose light. They were supported by Coun Martin Phipps.

One earlier objection states: “Even in 2019, the Sheffield Our City Our Future report recommended there was more than sufficient space, and this was before changes in work patterns as a result of COVID.”

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