Review: Blithe Spirit, University Drama Studio

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Blithe Spirit, University Drama Studio

Noel Coward’s farce is well done by an on form cast with Kay Massey directing.

Sceptic Charles Condomine gets more than he bargained for when he conducts a séance and his first wife appears.

Jonathan Jones resists the urge to go over the top as Madame Arcati, and conducts himself and the séance in a relatively restrained manner. He carries his flamboyant cross dressing off with style however and stares into space whilst conversing with ghosts as well as any blind man would.

If only all spooks could be as sexy and mischievous as Heather Knowles’s Elvira. Despite seven years, six feet under, a silvery complexion and a funereal gown she looks a million dollars.

Her bantering exchanges with Adam Booth as Charles are hilarious. She’s been snatched away from a game of backgammon with Genghis Khan and thinks she’s in with a chance with a somewhat more warm blooded ex.

Coward’s witty script is also evident as Charles bickers with second wife Ruth, played by Corrynne Osborne. Charles remarks you’d rather see me writhe on the floor debasing myself than succeed. He also wryly observes people are shocked more by honesty than deceit.

The subject of madness is an interesting theme here. Charles is accused of being mad for seeing a spirit, which Ruth cannot see. When things start moving across the room however, does that make Ruth mad or Charles sane?

The set is great, evoking the 1930s. There are even some clever spooky special effects with crockery flying off the shelves at the end. Also remember to replenish Madame Arcati’s cucumber sandwich supply!

Stephen Grigg Blithe Spirit, University Drama Studio

Noel Coward’s farce is well done by an on form cast with Kay Massey directing.

Sceptic Charles Condomine gets more than he bargained for when he conducts a séance and his first wife appears.

Jonathan Jones resists the urge to go over the top as Madame Arcati, and conducts himself and the séance in a relatively restrained manner. He carries his flamboyant cross dressing off with style however and stares into space whilst conversing with ghosts as well as any blind man would.

If only all spooks could be as sexy and mischievous as Heather Knowles’s Elvira. Despite seven years, six feet under, a silvery complexion and a funereal gown she looks a million dollars.

Her bantering exchanges with Adam Booth as Charles are hilarious. She’s been snatched away from a game of backgammon with Genghis Khan and thinks she’s in with a chance with a somewhat more warm blooded ex.

Coward’s witty script is also evident as Charles bickers with second wife Ruth, played by Corrynne Osborne. Charles remarks you’d rather see me writhe on the floor debasing myself than succeed. He also wryly observes people are shocked more by honesty than deceit.

The subject of madness is an interesting theme here. Charles is accused of being mad for seeing a spirit, which Ruth cannot see. When things start moving across the room however, does that make Ruth mad or Charles sane?

The set is great, evoking the 1930s. There are even some clever spooky special effects with crockery flying off the shelves at the end. Also remember to replenish Madame Arcati’s cucumber sandwich supply!

Stephen Grigg