TODAY’S WOMAN: Catwalk trends to rule Britannia

A model presenting an outfit by David Koma, at London Fashion Week in London. AP Photo/Jonathan Short/PA Photos.
A model presenting an outfit by David Koma, at London Fashion Week in London. AP Photo/Jonathan Short/PA Photos.
0
Have your say

Fear not if your front row ticket for London Fashion Week didn’t arrive in the post. We’ve rounded up the hottest catwalk looks...

What gets Hollywood’s biggest names, the fashion elite AND and the Prime Minister’s wife together in stylish harmony?

Samantha Cameron arriving for the David Koma fashion show at London Fashion Week. AP Photo/Jonathan Short/PA Photos.

Samantha Cameron arriving for the David Koma fashion show at London Fashion Week. AP Photo/Jonathan Short/PA Photos.

It can only be London Fashion Week.

While her hubby was busy running the country, Samantha Cameron took on her VIP role as ambassador for Fashion Week, launching the event and later rubbing shoulders with the likes of Anna Wintour and Claudia Schiffer.

Style might not be high on the list of Government priorities but, with 110 shows and the attention of the world’s media focussed, London Fashion Week boosts the image of an industry worth more than £400 million to the economy.

Orders are placed, trends are set, careers are catapulted... and the rest of us get a sneak preview of what we’ll be wearing next season.

A model wearing designs by Henry Holland during the House of Holland catwalk show, at the Old Sorting Office, in central London, as part of London Fashion Week.  Dominic Lipinski/PA Photos.

A model wearing designs by Henry Holland during the House of Holland catwalk show, at the Old Sorting Office, in central London, as part of London Fashion Week. Dominic Lipinski/PA Photos.

We’ve barely seen a hint of spring sunshine yet, but the fashion world has just showcased autumn/winter.

Expect glamour in abundance. Stand-out shows by Antonio Berardi, Jonathan Saunders and Erdem all put a slick, elegant silhouette on the agenda.

Although the top trends can’t be fully deciphered until Milan and Paris fashion weeks have also been staged, London’s message was loud and clear: lashings of red, dotty prints and granny-chic ensembles will rule Britannia...

BERRY SHADES

models presenting outfits by Aquascutum at London Fashion Week in London.  AP Photo/Jonathan Short/PA Photos.

models presenting outfits by Aquascutum at London Fashion Week in London. AP Photo/Jonathan Short/PA Photos.

Bold brights are in for the A/W11 season.

New York Fashion Week feature berry in abundance, but it was red that really caught the spotlight in London.

But just like everything in fashion, every designer has their own interpretation and signature reds varied from tomato at Betty Jackson to oxblood at Nicole Farhi and a mix of prim berry tones at Kate Middleton’s favourite, Issa.

GRANNY CHIC

models presenting outfits by Holly Fulton, at London Fashion Week in London. AP Photo/Jonathan Short/PA Photos.

models presenting outfits by Holly Fulton, at London Fashion Week in London. AP Photo/Jonathan Short/PA Photos.

Raid those charity shops and check out your nan’s wardrobe.

Granny glamour - with a modern twist - has come of age on the catwalks.

House of Holland’s bingo card invite was an indication of the theme of his collection. and indeed, it featured heritage tweeds, crocheted shawls, pearl accessories and hold-up socks.

There were sexier undertones of the glamour granny theme at Christopher Kane, who opened his show with traditional craft crochet in dark, muted tones.

But this wasn’t crochet as we know it. Tops and skirts were worn without underskirts, revealing skin aplenty, and sexy black leather was given a twist embossed with crochet motifs.

GOING DOTTY

Models on the catwalk during the Jonathan Saunders catwalk show, at Kingdom Street, in Paddington, London, as part of London Fashion Week.  Dominic Lipinski/PA Photos.

Models on the catwalk during the Jonathan Saunders catwalk show, at Kingdom Street, in Paddington, London, as part of London Fashion Week. Dominic Lipinski/PA Photos.

Following on from Marc Jacobs’ trend-setting show in New York, brace yourself for polka dots.

Designers have gone dotty for spotty style - Topshop Unique went barking mad with a 101 Dalmatians-inspired theme hinged on a heavy dose of monochrome spattered on faux fur coats, dresses, trousers and accessories.

David Koma’s collection was more avant garde art with hallucinatory spot patterns, and circular and curved seams used to emphasise the female form.

LONG LENGTHS

Chuck those mini skirts to one side.

It’s flowing hemlines all the way to winter.

From just below the knee elegance at Jonathan Saunders to floor-sweeping glamour at Issa and Antonio Berardi, dresses and skirts are going low next season.

Versatility is key to the maxi’s timeliness. “I wanted a collection of clothes that went from day to evening,” Berardi said.

Todd Lynn demonstrated how even glam long silk skirts could instantly be transported into daywear territory by layering them with knits, furs and biker jackets.

TEXTURE CLASH

Designers were going crazy with fabric.

Stand-out pieces like dresses and coats didn’t just incorporate one material, but two or even three in clashing colours and textures.

Aquascutum called the technique ‘collage construction’ with unexpected mixes of fabrics bringing modernity to heritage pieces, like their herringbone coat with sporty blue puffer shrug attached.

Other notable texture clashes included cotton and leather at Jaeger, lace and lamé at Berardi and, the most intriguing of all, Christopher Kane’s teaming of sequins with plastic trims filled with coloured liquid.

His inspiration? “Sodastreams, lava lamps and pencil cases.”

model on the catwalk at the Erdem catwalk show, at the University of Westminster, as part of London Fashion Week. Dominic Lipinski/PA

model on the catwalk at the Erdem catwalk show, at the University of Westminster, as part of London Fashion Week. Dominic Lipinski/PA