Small screen fame for Sheffield scissor firm

Julie Dore, Nick Wright & Master Cutter, Pam Liversage'Pictured at The New Ernest Wright , Show Room factory , on Broad lane Sheffield.
Julie Dore, Nick Wright & Master Cutter, Pam Liversage'Pictured at The New Ernest Wright , Show Room factory , on Broad lane Sheffield.
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IT was lights, camera, action for one of Sheffield’s last-remaining scissor makers when television crews descended.

Family-run firm Ernest Wright and Son will be thrust into the spotlight when it appears in an episode of BBC Two series Handmade Revolution this Friday.

The Broad Lane business, which is one of just two companies still making scissors in the city, was visited by presenter Paul Martin and producers earlier this year for a tour of the factory. They met employees, including scissor ‘putter togetherer’ Cliff Denton who is working past retirement to train an apprentice and ensure his highly-skilled work can be performed by a new generation.

The 110-year-old Ernest Wright and Son was once one of the biggest scissor producers in the world, but is now aiming to reinvent itself as a shining example of a historic local business making and selling quality handmade products on site, such as manicure scissors, garden blades, tailoring shears, embroiderer’s scissors and spectacular ceremonial sets.

Each pair is shaped, hardened, sharpened and assembled in the heart of the city.

The BBC hand-picked the firm to be part of the Handmade Revolution series, which campaigns to put Britain back in touch with its proud craft traditions.

Owner Nick Wright said: “Having television cameras come to see the work we do is long due recognition for our small but dedicated workforce who are diligently keeping one of Sheffield’s, and the country’s, proudest manufacturing traditions alive. Wehope viewers will be attracted by the quality and tradition behind our products to support us.”

Handmade Revolutions is at 3.45pm on Friday on BBC2.