Sheffield light fantastic hall to go for millions

The Grade II listed Parkhead Hall, on Ecclesall Road South, is one of the few Victorian mansions still used as a private residence in Sheffield, and is expected to change hands for millions of pounds.
The Grade II listed Parkhead Hall, on Ecclesall Road South, is one of the few Victorian mansions still used as a private residence in Sheffield, and is expected to change hands for millions of pounds.
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WHO lives in a house like this?

Presumably the lucky individual who can afford the price tag on a property with six reception rooms, seven bedrooms, a personal library, wine cellar and four acres of land.

The Grade II-listed Parkhead Hall, on Ecclesall Road South, is one of the few Victorian mansions still used as a private residence in Sheffield – and is expected to change hands for millions of pounds.

The price could potentially exceed the £4 million paid four years ago for boxer Prince Naseem’s opulent pile, Castle Dyke House, one of the most expensive sales the city has ever seen.

Formally known as The Woodlands, the hall was built in 1864 and boasts imposing, Gothic-revival architecture in ornate, carved stone.

The 10,000 sq feet property is currently owned by millionaire towbar manufacturer Andrew Hogg, after being confiscated from jailed fraudster Stephen Hinchliffe and sold back to his bank.

Nick Riddle, from estate agents Eadon, Lockwood and Riddle, said many similar properties were either pulled down or converted as tastes changed after the Second World War.

“Proper mansions in private hands are few and far between these days,” he said, adding potential buyers have had to prove they have the money to buy the house before even being given a viewing.

“There’s always going to be a handful of people out there with the money to buy the house they want, at whatever price they want to pay.

“There’s still a lot of wealth in Sheffield, but it tends to be more the new money that buys the massive houses.”

Mr Riddle said a house in Whirlow recently sold for £5 million, while a property on Townhead Road, Dore, was bought for £2.3 million, only for the owners to demolish it and set about building a new home on the site.

Parkhead Hall was designed by architect John Mitchell Withers for his own use, and became a judges’ lodging house in 1938, selling for a then-staggering £6,750.

During the war, it was commandeered by the RAF, and was later used as an old people’s home, before being turned into offices by Hinchliffe in 1989. In 2003, the current owners – only the third family to live there – bought the hall and turned it back into a family residence.

Mr Riddle said: “It’s in a suburban area, but on the edge of the countryside, and is renovated to a very high standard.

“There’s also planning permission if somebody wanted to do something later on.

“They can put their own mark on it, which I think is important.”

By Richard Blackledge