Late photographer’s iconic snaps go on show in Sheffield

Steve Bradley from Harland Cafe and Edwina Jenkinson with 2 of Martin Jenkinsons pictures which will be on display over the coming weeks as his exhibition opens on 28th July 2012
Steve Bradley from Harland Cafe and Edwina Jenkinson with 2 of Martin Jenkinsons pictures which will be on display over the coming weeks as his exhibition opens on 28th July 2012
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DRAMATIC images by a photographer who chronicled the industrial unrest in South Yorkshire during the 1980s have gone on show for the first time at a Sheffield cafe.

Harland Cafe, on John Street, is displaying a selection of pictures by Martin Jenkinson, who died last month aged 64.

The cafe was one of Martin’s favourite haunts and the exhibition was put together following his death by the respected photographer’s friends and family, together with the Harland’s owner Steve Bradley.

Steve said it was ‘a privilege’ to be hosting Martin’s debut exhibition and said the show has been attracting visitors keen on photography, as well as left-wing politics.

“Martin and his friends, who were also photographers, used the cafe over the last few years - it was a place for them to meet and have coffee,” Steve said.

“Some of the images are quite famous and obviously have been used in newspapers, but then some have never been shown before.

“They’re really great images of the last 30 years of left-wing politics. There are pictures of different Labour leaders and Prime Ministers, and there’s a great picture of Mo Mowlam.”

The 24 pictures which comprise the exhibition are displayed on the cafe’s walls, Steve added.

“We’ve had lots of people using the cafe who are really enjoying the images and can relate back to things like the miners’ strike,” he said.

Martin, a former steelworker, picked up his camera when he was made redundant in 1976, specialising in union matters.

His most famous images include a photo capturing the arrest of NUM leader Arthur Scargill.

Harland Cafe started holding monthly exhibitions in June, when it showed pieces by local artist Helen Purdie.

The second show was by a group of seven photography students from Norton College.

“We’d really like to hold events that have a social benefit, promoting a particular person at the start of their career, or supporting a charity or local initiative,” Steve said.

“We’re quite a humble, rustic place, so to host Martin’s exhibition is a real privilege. It all came together at the right moment.”

Martin’s friend Mark Harvey, who helped select the pictures, said: “I think he was up there with some of the best photojournalists the country has ever had, but he never showed his work. Even now I’m finding images in his archive nobody has ever seen.”

Prints of Martin’s work can be ordered through the cafe during the exhibition, which runs until the end of August.